Tagged stock assessments

Let’s Keep the ‘Status of the Stocks’ Strong

The just-released report indicates that we continue to make important headway in ending overfishing and reducing the number of overfished stocks. In addition, the agency finds that 37 once-depleted fish populations have been rebuilt to healthy levels since 2000. However, the report also highlights issues that still need to be addressed. … More Info »

McMurray on Menhaden: Don’t Kill the Comeback

Charter boat captain and Mid-Atlantic fishery management council member John McMurray has an important message about menhaden in his latest post at the site Reel Time. … More Info »

The Question Not Asked

On January 5th, Senators Markey and Warren sent a set of questions to Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration concerning Atlantic cod. Paraphrasing the Senators’ questions for purposes of space and simplification, here’s how I would answer them … More Info »

With Menhaden Making a Comeback, Managers are at a Crossroads

It appears that we may soon get some promising news about the fish that’s sometimes called the most important one in the sea—the Atlantic menhaden. These small forage fish constitute a key part of the marine food web, and now the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is nearing completion of a new assessment of the stock. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, September 26

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NMFS announced the closure of the George’s Bank Atlantic herring fishery; NEFMC invested $800,000 in collaborative research projects; a UMass Dartmouth professor received $205,000 for bycatch-reducing technology development; NEFSC began a new campaign to protect North Atlantic Right Whales; NEFMC is seeking SSC nominees; local organizations disapprove of the new Gloucester Harbor Plan; Maine lobster supply returns to average levels; Maine lobster processors receive government loan; a Globe article describes the effects of climate change on Maine lobster; the Gulf of Maine Lobster Fishery enters the next phase of MSC certification; scallop landings are declining; Oceana pushes for reform of gillnet use; an opinion piece on menhaden; GAO finds geographic disparity in stock assessments; Lee Crocket of Pew Charitable Trusts promotes ecosystem-based fisheries management; and NFSC publishes a report on electronic monitoring in fisheries data collection. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, September 12

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, saltwater recreational fishermen ask Congress for greater representation under the Magnuson-Stevens Act; oyster beds on Martha’s Vineyard are temporarily closed; the Maine lobster industry pursues sustainable certification assessment; state fish trawl survey reports record low catches; New Hampshire residents take back ownership of their food through a community-supported fishery model; the Long Island Sound lobster fishery faces a three-month closure; NOAA supports a right whale conservation campaign; a new NOAA report examines the environmental effects of derelict fishing gear; the California blue whale population has rebounded; a new whale protection app launched this week; researchers study the effects of ocean acidification on mussels and sharks; and U.S. shrimp imports set a new record. … More Info »

“Known is a drop. Unknown is an ocean.”

That still-true ancient line, penned by Tamil poet Avvaiyar some two thousand years ago, reminds us all that while it is worth paying attention to what we see, it is often critical not to be seduced by our convictions about what it means. And so it is that recent reports from the Portland waterfront of bountiful cod can neither be ignored nor fully credited. … More Info »

Former New England Council Chair Calls for More Protection for Cod

When fishing columnist Rip Cunningham read the latest assessment of the rapidly deteriorating condition of New England’s cod stocks, he wrote, “Can you spell ‘real disaster’?” … More Info »

The Beer-Reviewed Stock Assessment: A Fisheries Phenomenon

We’ve all heard about peer-reviewed stock assessments. That’s what you get when a team of biologists assesses the health of one stock of fish, and another panel of expert scientists, unrelated to the first, reviews that team’s work and determines whether it is good enough to use for fisheries management purposes. If it is, it represents a sort of “gold standard” for fisheries managers, who can then establish regulations based on the assessment, and be reasonably certain that they’re doing the right thing. However, if you go down to the docks, pick up a press release put out by one of the anglers’ rights groups or read some of the comments on Internet chat boards, you’ll find that a lot of people don’t give the peer-reviewed assessments, or the scientists who provide them, much weight. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, June 27

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, a new study suggests changes in forage fish abundance may have contributed to controversy surrounding cod stock assessments; the Washington Post responds to President Obama’s protection of Pacific marine habitat; Cape fishermen applaud the Council’s herring decisions; Regional Fishery Management Council appointments are announced; great white sharks are rebounding off the eastern US; Cape Pond Ice looks to diversify; Maine considers a referendum to support lobster processing capacity; a New York Times opinion piece calls for sourcing more of our seafood domestically; the Council hears a positive report on individual scallop quotas; NMFS approves an experimental fishery for barndoor skates. … More Info »