Tagged overfishing

Managing Fisheries in “A Climate of Change”

The Maine nonprofit Island Institute organized the two-day symposium “A Climate of Change” to bring fishermen, scientists, fishery managers, and NGOs together to share information and ideas about how climate change is already affecting fishing, and what they can do about it. … More Info »

Uncertain Science Isn’t to Blame for Groundfish Crisis

The real issue is not whether there is uncertainty in fisheries management science. Of course there is, and the more you get into the weeds of fishery management science the more the numerous uncertainties reveal themselves. The real issue is how managers choose to deal with the uncertainty that is inherent in fisheries management. In New England, by and large, they deal with it badly. … More Info »

Overfishing Threatens Genetic Diversity of Winter Flounder

New research by scientists in six bays of Long Island, New York, shows that overfishing of winter flounder living in these bays has led to severe inbreeding, a factor that is not typically considered in marine fisheries management. … More Info »

On Climate, Cod, Copepods, and Conjunctions

The warming of New England’s waters due to climate change is affecting the availability of food for larval cod, according to a study by scientists at NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center. Fortunately, two upcoming events promise to expand the conversation about climate change and fishing. Unfortunately, some media coverage of this important science does a great disservice by misrepresenting the results. … More Info »

Worst times, or just very, very bad? Industry splits hairs over the awful condition of cod

There remain some marginal voices in the fishing industry who continue to claim that cod populations are not in bad shape. Taking issue with a recent conclusion of mine that Atlantic cod were in their worst condition in history, these apologists for overfishing suggest that cod are just “in the middle of a rebuilding period.” Nonsense. … More Info »

At-Sea Catch of River Herring Gets Long Overdue Attention

Severely depleted river herring and shad have been the focus of extensive restoration efforts in rivers for years—dams have come down, fish ladders and passages have gone up, and millions of dollars have been spent to improve habitat and water quality. Yet the loss of hundreds of thousands of these fish in the nets of trawlers has gone largely unaddressed—until now. … More Info »

The Bottom Line: For New England’s Fishing Fleet It’s Déjà Vu All Over Again

Twenty years later, the sense of déjà vu is unshakeable. A new season brings a troubling scenario of depleted fish populations and deficient management. Fourteen of the region’s 20 groundfish—or bottom dwelling—species are currently overexploited. Cod stocks are at the lowest levels ever recorded. New England’s best captains could not find enough cod in the past year to meet more than a third of their allotted quota on Georges Bank. It is, officially, an economic disaster, as the U.S. Department of Commerce declared last fall. In short, here we are, with our storied fishing grounds in even worse shape than they were two decades ago. … More Info »

CLF, EJ to NMFS: Protect Habitat, End Overfishing and Bring Back Cod

Reinforcing the need to protect vital ocean habitat areas and end overfishing of New England’s severely depleted groundfish, the Conservation Law Foundation and Earthjustice filed a pair of lawsuits in federal district court challenging the shortsighted and damaging groundfish regulations developed by the New England Fishery Management Council and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the 2013 fishing year. … More Info »

What should the future of fishing look like?

This week in Washington, D.C., a diverse group of people will try to answer this question. The Managing Our Nation’s Fisheries III conference is the first step towards revising the nation’s law governing fisheries management. … More Info »

The Bottom Line: Big Turnout for Little Menhaden

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission has seen a lot in its 70-year history but nothing quite like this. More than 128,000 people flooded the commission’s inboxes with postcards and emails last month, a new record for public comment. Scientists, small business owners, nature lovers, and anglers sent letters and spoke out at public hearings. And it was all about a fish that almost no one ever eats—Atlantic menhaden. … More Info »