Tagged overfishing

New England’s Fishing Pathology

The industrial herring fleet recently overshot its quota for the herring management area 1B by some 60%. Sixty percent! That is like driving 104 mph in a 65 mph speed zone. This incident—and particularly the herring fleet’s response to it—are symptomatic of a deeper pathology in some of New England’s fisheries that should not be allowed to just fade away as another bad memory of a poorly managed fishery. … More Info »

No Refuge For Fish? Stressed Species Need Safe Habitat

Overfishing and warming waters are combining to create a potent one-two punch that threatens significant harm to New England’s already beleaguered fish and fishermen. Fortunately, there is one thing we can do to help cushion both blows: protect ocean habitat — the places where fish spawn, grow, and find shelter and food. … More Info »

NOAA Reports Aren’t All Doom and Gloom

On Tuesday, NOAA released two annual reports on the status of our nation’s fisheries—Fisheries Economics of the U.S. 2012 and Status of Stocks 2013. These reports, for the most part, tell a pretty positive picture of United States fisheries and federal management under the Magnuson-Stevens Act. So why have the Gloucester Daily Times and the New Bedford Standard-Times said these reports “show [a] grim picture” with “good news…hard to come by?” … More Info »

Commonwealth Loses Lawsuit on Lower Catch Limits

With a court decision released on April 8 which denied the Commonwealth’s claims, Coakley’s lawsuit has run its predicted course. It’s time to recognize that we need real solutions such as stopping overfishing, protecting habitat, reducing bycatch and improving ocean management. … More Info »

Rep. Hastings’ Empty Oceans Act Is a Surefire Disaster for New England’s Ocean, Fisheries and Communities

Tomorrow morning in the Nation’s Capital the House Natural Resources Committee will convene to deliberate a “discussion draft” of a bill to revise the Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA). After oversight hearings by both the House and the Senate last year, Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings has made the first legislative effort to put his Congressional pen to paper. Simply put, the Hastings draft ignores the state of New England’s fisheries and the need to move modern fishery management forward. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, January 31

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the NEFMC meets and discusses Magnuson reauthorization; a new reality show seeks Maine fishermen; another study finds a link between climate change and shrinking fish; police say they have found the culprit in last summer’s oyster farm robberies; Maine and the Passamaquoddy tribe approach an agreement on elvers; a study recommends a multifaceted approach to EBFM; new research says depletion due to overfishing can be predicted; Rip Cunningham recommends caution in fishing low on the food chain; a Maine lawmaker introduces a bill to ban pesticides that could harm lobsters. … More Info »

Tearing the “Invisible Fabric” of Nature

A major recent study documents incidents of overfishing that pushed ecosystems beyond tipping points from which they could not rebound, “flipping” them into new states. The meta-study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences includes examples from around the world—from the Namibian coast and Nile Delta to right here in New England’s waters. In each, over-exploitation of resources triggered a domino effect in the food web, “fundamentally transforming ecosystems to those that are often less productive for fisheries, more prone to cycles of booms and busts, and thus less manageable.” … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, January 3

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, a former NEFMC member argues that this isn’t New England’s first groundfish crisis; river herring restoration takes off in Rhode Island; Maine shrimp fishermen hope a moratorium will help stocks recover; a Montauk fisherman survived twelve hours adrift after falling overboard; State Senator Tarr introduces a bill to market Massachusetts seafood; Maine regulators develop a rockweed management plan; Maine’s Department of Marine Resources holds the last public hearing on elver catch cuts; a new study says overfishing can permanently alter ecosystems; local cod are scarce in Cape Cod restaurants. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, September 27

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Council makes decisions on Georges Bank yellowtail and river herring bycatch; an feature on ocean acidification highlights its potential to cause serious harm to marine life; several articles focus on changes in fish distribution due to rising sea temperatures; UMass Dartmouth creates a new fisheries research fund; the Massachusetts Port Authority focuses on revitalizing the Fish Pier; Capt. John McMurray supports rebuilding deadlines for overfished stocks. … More Info »

Another One Bites the Dust?

Georges Bank yellowtail was once one of the major species sustaining the New Bedford fleet. Caution should have led managers to consider closing this fishery and closing the areas supporting the remnant yellowtail breeding populations. That apparently was not even on the table. … More Info »