Tagged overfishing

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, October 11

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, overfished cod are not on target to rebuild by 2024; 15,000 Atlantic salmon will be put into the Penobscot River over the next three years; overfishing of Atlantic striped bass prompts action; and lobsters and fish fall victim to low oxygen levels in Cape Cod Bay. … More Info »

Make Your Voice Heard – Three Opportunities For Public Comment

NOAA Fisheries is currently seeking public comment on three management actions developed by the New England Fishery Management Council. For those interested in submitting feedback to the agency, we quickly breakdown each of these proposed actions as comment deadlines are fast approaching. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 9

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, mercury levels in fish are on the rise; Atlantic mackerel is added to the overfished list; Maine fishermen should plan for accelerated ocean warming; and puffins thrive on Maine’s remote islands. … More Info »

NMFS Receives Failing Grades on 2018 Status Report

NMFS recently released its 2018 Status of the Stocks report. While general progress is being made towards sustainable fisheries at the national level, fish stocks in New England and highly migratory species continue to struggle under poor management. It’s time for NMFS to take responsibility for both its successes and failures. … More Info »

Feds Propose New Management Measures for Gulf of Maine Cod Recreational Fishery

Recreational fishing is a favorite pastime for many New Englanders. Unfortunately, due to low population levels and concerns about catch limit overages, the recreational possession of New England’s most iconic fish – Atlantic cod – has been prohibited in the Gulf of Maine (federal waters) in recent years. For now, this prohibition is still in place, but NOAA Fisheries has proposed reopening the Gulf of Maine cod recreational fishery for the 2019 fishing year. … More Info »

A New Groundfish Season Brings More of the Same

The 2019 fishing year kicked off yesterday, May 1, for New England’s groundfish fishery. Given the federal government shutdown earlier this year, though, management changes – such as updated catch limits – that would typically come with a new fishing year will be slightly delayed. Unfortunately, a 15 percent catch limit increase for Georges Bank cod is still on the table. … More Info »

NOAA Fisheries Reverses Course On Herring Catch In 2019

In a pleasant surprise, NOAA Fisheries published a final rule today that lowers the catch limits of Atlantic herring in 2019, specifically to account for its role in the ecosystem. Catch limits were expected to be reduced to prevent overfishing, but the size of this reduction was a surprise because the agency had originally proposed limits back in November that were almost 30 percent higher than recommendations from the New England Fishery Management Council and its scientific advisors. … More Info »

Environmental Groups Call on Fishery Managers to Fix New England’s Failing Monitoring Program

Conservation Law Foundation and Environmental Defense Fund have challenged NOAA Fisheries, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the New England Fishery Management Council to properly manage the region’s ailing groundfish stocks. In a letter sent to the leaders of these agencies, CLF and EDF call for improvements to monitoring practices so that managers can make informed decisions. … More Info »

NOAA Releases Stats on U.S. Fishing

NOAA Fisheries released two reports last week on U.S. commercial and recreational fishing. The reports, though only snapshots, provide important insights into fisheries management in New England. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, July 20

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, regulators allow banned fishermen to sell quota; Canadian officials search for entangled North Atlantic right whale; Deepwater Wind is committed to working with fishermen; NEFMC is collecting comments on proposed changes to the whiting fishery; and lobster license plate supports vital research. … More Info »