Tagged observers

Every Fish Counts

Last week, the New England Fishery Management Council voted to reduce observer coverage for groundfish sector vessels to 13 percent for the 2016 fishing year. This, combined with recent quota cuts – particularly for Atlantic cod – creates a very dangerous situation. … More Info »

Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Missing Cod

Fishermen claim that Gulf of Maine cod stock populations are high, and fishery managers recently reopened additional closed areas around Cape Ann in May and June where cod seem to linger after spawning. Yet, nearly three months into the 2015 fishing year, the amount of cod reported as caught is as low as 13% of the ACL. What can explain this mystery? … More Info »

Atlantic Forage Fish Need Public Oversight of the Industrial Trawl Fleet

Scientists and fishermen agree that the industrial midwater trawl fleet is taking a toll on many species on the Atlantic Coast. The massive nets of these vessels kill millions of river herring and, increasingly, the juveniles of some commercially important groundfish such as haddock. Unfortunately, an important action to rein in this damage is facing a substantial delay. … More Info »

Is NOAA studying river herring to death?

If you’ve been following the (mis)management of river herring over the last few years, you may not even be surprised at the latest shenanigans of the NOAA fisheries officials: a delay tactic in the form of a “working group.” This powerless, unmanageably large, and unfairly stacked “Technical Expert Working Group (TEWG)” is purportedly meant to comprehensively address the multifaceted problems facing river herring. But it looks more like an effort to study these little fish to death, instead of taking meaningful action to bring them back from the brink. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, February 28

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NOAA will cover the cost of at-sea observers for Fishing Year 2014; New England will receive $33 million in fisheries disaster funding; NEFMC meets to select preferred habitat alternatives; scientists say Maine didn’t know about mercury contamination in the Penobscot until last year; a Telegraph article says Cape Cod is missing its cod; new research shows blood harvesting may influence horseshoe crab behavior; the United States calls for a moratorium on Arctic fishing; the Economist and National Geographic host a World Ocean Summit where John Kerry calls for expanded global marine reserves. … More Info »

Keeping Watch: Another attempt to monitor the largest vessels fishing our waters

The New England Fishery Management Council is poised once again to address the inadequate monitoring of a major fishery—the midwater trawl vessels of the Atlantic herring fleet. Fishermen occasionally bristle at having observers on their boats. But they also know that we simply can’t make good decisions about our fisheries if we don’t know what’s happening on the water. Without an accurate assessment of fishing effort, mortality, and bycatch, fisheries management is akin to flying in the dark. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, October 25

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, a WSJ article focuses on tension between fishermen and at-sea observers; NOAA will stop printing nautical charts; the Maine Lobstermen’s Union grows, but so does the divide within the lobster industry; the founder of a Maine lobster processing company wins an entrepreneurship award; the Center for Sustainable Fisheries holds its first board meeting; the shutdown continues to affect fisheries management; NMFS lifts monkfish possession limits for groundfish and scallop vessels; the World Wildlife Fund calls for no increase in Atlantic bluefin quota. … More Info »