Tagged New England Coral Canyons and Seamounts

Looking out for our future: Obama designates the first Atlantic Marine National Monument

Today, President Obama will announce designation of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, recognizing the area for its scientific importance and making history for our region and nation. The president’s action, which is an authority granted to him by Congress under the Antiquities Act, will create the only landscape-scale, fully protected marine area in the U.S. Atlantic Ocean – preserving this area now and forever. … More Info »

The Case for a Marine National Monument Off New England

The array of life in these underwater mountains and canyons deserves protection now. … More Info »

The Plight of the Puffin: Protect Our Fish, Our Birds, and Our Ocean Ecosystem

This summer, sadly, the puffin chicks on Machias Seal Island are starving due to a food shortage. As reported by the Portland Press Herald, typically 60 percent of nests produce fledglings –birds that fly off to sea at the end of summer. Only 12 percent of nests produced fledglings this year; that’s just 320 chicks. Worse yet, the chicks are undersized and the scientists studying the colony do not expect them to survive to breeding age. What’s causing the food shortage on Machias Seal Island resulting in the worst breeding season on record, and what can we do to help? … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 12

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, the MAFMC approves an ecosystem-based management guidance document; Massachusetts promotes local seafood through a new marketing program; the “Good Catch!” campaign bolsters New England’s sustainable seafood businesses; the Ninth Circuit Court upholds federal fishery fees; why are New England’s wild blue mussels disappearing?; the Island Institute releases its lobster fishery characterization study; UMass Dartmouth forms a partnership with Iceland; meeting materials from ASMFC’s 2016 summer meeting are now available; NOAA Fisheries establishes international marine mammal bycatch criteria for U.S. imports; and an op-ed says protecting the NE coral canyons and seamounts is crucial to fisheries. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 5

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, the Connecticut delegation urges President Obama to designate the first marine national monument in the Atlantic Ocean; NOAA Fisheries considers moving trawl surveys to fishing vessels; fishing regulators tighten rules for removing dogfish fins; regulators fail to decide on 2017 Atlantic menhaden catch caps; Larry the Lobsters dies on his journey to Maine; trawlers are suspected in disappearance of shad and herring offshore; a Fisherman’s Wife will be named to the Seafood Hall of Fame; and an op-ed supports the Magnuson-Stevens Act. … More Info »

The potential of the Gulf of Maine

In the August 2016 issue of National Fisherman, Chairman of the Board of Diversified Communications, publisher of National Fisherman, Daniel Hildreth asks “what is the potential of the Gulf of Maine to support a healthy marine ecosystem and abundant fish stocks?” He thinks that we can find the answer by permanently protecting Cashes Ledge as marine national monument. … More Info »

Fishing Groups Exaggerate Economic Impacts of a New England Marine National Monument

The New England Coral Canyons and Seamounts Area holds remarkable ecologic value—ancient deep sea coral gardens, abundant and diverse marine mammal populations, as well as sea turtles and sea birds, and an array of rare and unusual marine species. The area is also distinguished by how little fishing actually occurs there. It is truly one of the least fished areas on the U.S. Atlantic Seaboard. That’s why I have to call out erroneous claims that creating a marine national monument in New England’s Coral Canyons and Seamounts would have “devastating economic impacts” on any fishery or port in New England. The facts simply contradict those claims. … More Info »

Winter Home of Maine Puffins Revealed

Until this summer, the winter home of Maine puffins was largely unknown, but that has suddenly changed with revelations discovered this year. … More Info »

A Call for Protections

The Gulf of Maine is warming fast — faster than almost any other ocean area in the world. To say this is alarm­ing is an understatement, and action is needed today to permanently protect large areas of the ocean, which scientists say is one of the best buffers against the disastrous effects of climate change. To that end, a diverse group of ma­rine-oriented businesses, hundreds of marine scientists, aquaria, conservation organizations and members of the public are calling on the Obama administration to designate the Cashes Ledge Closed Area and the New England Coral Can­yons and Seamounts as the first Marine National Monuments in the Atlantic. (Originally published in National Fisherman) … More Info »

We Must Do More to Save Deep-Sea Corals

Less than 100 miles offshore from the heavily populated Eastern Seaboard lie submerged seascapes that look more like visions from another world than the cities and landmarks for which they are named. Most amazing, perhaps, are the living structures known as deep-sea corals that many of these animals depend upon for habitat. The Magnuson-Stevens Act is due for renewal—and the deep-sea corals illustrate why we need to update this important law. … More Info »