Tagged Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council

The Plight of the Puffin: Protect Our Fish, Our Birds, and Our Ocean Ecosystem

This summer, sadly, the puffin chicks on Machias Seal Island are starving due to a food shortage. As reported by the Portland Press Herald, typically 60 percent of nests produce fledglings –birds that fly off to sea at the end of summer. Only 12 percent of nests produced fledglings this year; that’s just 320 chicks. Worse yet, the chicks are undersized and the scientists studying the colony do not expect them to survive to breeding age. What’s causing the food shortage on Machias Seal Island resulting in the worst breeding season on record, and what can we do to help? … More Info »

Court Says Regulators Must Protect Keystone Species from Giant Trawlers

As victims of “bycatch,” river herring and shad populations have dwindled to less than 5 percent of their historic levels. A federal judge issued a ruling that could help protect these two keystone fish species. … More Info »

Of Sandeels and Tuna: We Need Your Help Getting Ahead of the Curve – John McMurray

The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council has started a scoping process for how to “initiate a regulatory action to prohibit the development of new, or expansion of existing, directed fisheries for unmanaged forage species until adequate scientific information is available to promote ecosystem sustainability.” The Council is looking for comments on eight specific questions, which John McMurray lists in his blog and offers his own opinions. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, June 12

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NEFMC Groundfish Committee recommends emergency action; MSA reauthorization must not swerve off course; House fisheries bill misses the boat on rebuilding plans; MAFMC protects deep-sea corals in historic vote; ASMFC will discuss options for Maine’s collapsed shrimp fisher; Maine’s sea urchin swipe card system faces skepticism; $50K grant aims to help Maine algae industry bloom; NJ DEP sues over seismic testing; all crew members are rescued after fishing vessel sinks; and Saltonstall-Kennedy grant decisions will be made next month. … More Info »

Deep-Sea Corals Win Historic Protection

Federal fisheries officials in the Mid-Atlantic voted on June 10 to create the largest protected area in U.S. Atlantic waters, a roughly 38,000 square-mile region where scientists have found an abundance of deep-sea corals. … More Info »

Decision Time for Deep Corals in the Mid-Atlantic

On June 10, regional fisheries officials will have the chance to create the largest protected area in U.S. Atlantic waters when they vote on a proposal to help preserve deep-sea corals and the unique habitat these animals create. … More Info »

Protecting the Prey: A Plan for the Ocean Food Web’s Foundation

In a recent blog post at Reel Time, McMurray describes striped bass chasing sandeels, false albacore hunting bay anchovies, and fluke feeding on silversides. All those prey species are crucial and yet, he notes, they are not managed by fisheries officials. “Frankly, that really scares me,” McMurray says. … More Info »

Mid-Atlantic Managers Further Restrict Bycatch of River Herring and Shad

The Mid Atlantic Fishery Management Council moved Wednesday to sharply reduce the amount of river herring and shad that can be killed by the trawling vessels targeting Atlantic mackerel, an important step in the recovery of these important but imperiled little fish. … More Info »

Is NOAA studying river herring to death?

If you’ve been following the (mis)management of river herring over the last few years, you may not even be surprised at the latest shenanigans of the NOAA fisheries officials: a delay tactic in the form of a “working group.” This powerless, unmanageably large, and unfairly stacked “Technical Expert Working Group (TEWG)” is purportedly meant to comprehensively address the multifaceted problems facing river herring. But it looks more like an effort to study these little fish to death, instead of taking meaningful action to bring them back from the brink. … More Info »

Business as usual meets the new normal in New England fisheries

This overdue multi-agency session was hosted by the Mid-Atlantic Council in Washington, DC, and was intended to consider the implications of climate change for fisheries management along the US Atlantic coast. It was overdue in that climate change impacts are already being observed by fishermen and scientists alike, and adjusting to our new reality will not be easy and will take time. … More Info »