Tagged menhaden

Menhaden Meals

Atlantic menhaden are sometimes called “the most important fish in the sea” because so many animals depend on them for food. Here are just a few of those birds, fish, and marine mammals enjoying their favorite meal. … More Info »

McMurray on Menhaden: Don’t Kill the Comeback

Charter boat captain and Mid-Atlantic fishery management council member John McMurray has an important message about menhaden in his latest post at the site Reel Time. … More Info »

Menhaden Recovery Still Incomplete in New England

A recent article distributed by the fishing industry web site Saving Menhaden tells a great story about the ongoing recovery of Atlantic menhaden. The article’s claims are supported by mainstream media accounts that celebrate what happens when menhaden return to local waters. Unfortunately, both the story and the recovery of what is often referred to as “The Most Important Fish in The Sea” are incomplete. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, February 13

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, Boston is running out of room for snow; New England fishing communities are feeling the effects of climate change; Boston Globe asks if we should eat green crabs; Maine’s scallop industry improves with new management system; Connecticut governor supports mapping Long Island Sound; environmental groups go to court to protect blueback herring; Maine suspended 2015 elver licenses to prevent overfishing; fishery managers are at a crossroads with menhaden; a new program will provide more data on the closed northern shrimp fishery; ASMFC is considering amendments to the northern shrimp fishery management plan; MAFMC did not deep-sea coral protection established yet; mussels and oysters have low levels of disease and parasites; and blue crabs are moving north. … More Info »

With Menhaden Making a Comeback, Managers are at a Crossroads

It appears that we may soon get some promising news about the fish that’s sometimes called the most important one in the sea—the Atlantic menhaden. These small forage fish constitute a key part of the marine food web, and now the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is nearing completion of a new assessment of the stock. … More Info »

Manhattan’s Marine Mammals Make a Meal of Menhaden

New York might not be the first place you’d think of for a nature experience, but wildlife lovers there are thrilling to the sight of whales and dolphins within view of the city’s skyline. And the resurgence of these magnificent animals is partly due to the humble fish called menhaden. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 15

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Maine Department of Marine Resources authorized fishermen to harvest and sell green crabs without licensing; a program at UMaine received $20 million in grant funding to study sustainable ecological aquaculture; a study led by UMass Dartmouth scientists found an increase in the Georges Bank scallop population; a Washington Post reporter asks if surges in lobster availability have altered its popularity; the Maine Department of Marine Resources announced the 2014-15 scallop fishing season will be the same as the previous one; NOAA approved Massachusetts’ grant application, providing the state with $6.3 million direct federal financial assistance; cleaner New York Harbor waters means more food for humpback whales.
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Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 8

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NOAA estimates the numbers of breeding cod to be only at 3-4% of the target levels; a study found that whales’ contribution to ocean health is crucial; The National Audubon Society has asked for citizen help in an effort to understand how to aid an endangered Atlantic puffin population in the Gulf of Maine; poor oxygen levels throughout the water column in the Seekonk River led to the death of a couple hundred mature menhaden; as part of an effort to reduce whale entanglements in lobster fishing gear, new regulations were issued by the NMFS; the latest draft of the Magnuson-Stevens reauthorization bill would allow for councils to charge a fee of management programs; Maine’s new ocean acidification commission met to discuss its strategy for facing future challenges; a study indicates the Gulf of Maine spiny dogfish population is much bigger than past estimates suggested. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, July 18

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Boston Globe features Cashes Ledge; Maine grapples with its green crab problem; menhaden catch limits may mean higher bait prices; Massachusetts officials describe their plans to distribute federal fisheries disaster aid; the Maine Lobstermen’s Association may be released from a 1958 consent decree; Matt Jacobson is selected as the director of the Maine Lobster Marketing collaborative; Maine’s fishing stories are preserved through an oral history initiative; an abundance of jellyfish requires more research; Maine’s lobster season starts slowly due to a cold winter; Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations executive director Zeke Grader argues for a strong Magnuson-Stevens Act. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, July 4

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NOAA revises carryover rules to comply with a court ruling; the ASMFC discusses elver regulations; dam removals on the Kennebec River have helped river herring populations recover; the Nemasket River herring run declines; dead menhaden found floating off Virginia may be linked to an Omega Protein vessel; an editorial calls byatch “a frightening waste of fish”; Maine lobstermen are unhappy about new rules to reduce whale entanglements; Massachusetts lifts red tide shellfish closures; oyster reef restoration in the Great Bay estuary is making good progress; an editorial highlights the threat of ocean acidification and calls for local responses; a letter to the editor argues a strong Magnuson-Stevens Act can strengthen local seafood markets; climate change alters the marine life of Long Island Sound. … More Info »