Tagged Marine National Monument

The Case for a Marine National Monument Off New England

The array of life in these underwater mountains and canyons deserves protection now. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 26

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, puffin chicks in the Gulf of Maine’s largest colony are starving; ocean acidification threatens cod recruitment; Swedish scientists insist the American lobster threat is real; NOAA announces an Atlantic herring Eastern Maine spawning closure; a Maine state representative submits a bill to help the scallop and urchin fisheries; a University of Maine PhD candidate studies scallop fertilization success; lobstermen in Maine’s historically open zone vote to close their waters to newcomers; NOAA Fisheries approves new monkfish management measures; Gloucester will honor fishermen lost at sea at the 20th Annual Fisherman’s Memorial Service; and President Obama creates the largest protected place on the planet. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 5

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, the Connecticut delegation urges President Obama to designate the first marine national monument in the Atlantic Ocean; NOAA Fisheries considers moving trawl surveys to fishing vessels; fishing regulators tighten rules for removing dogfish fins; regulators fail to decide on 2017 Atlantic menhaden catch caps; Larry the Lobsters dies on his journey to Maine; trawlers are suspected in disappearance of shad and herring offshore; a Fisherman’s Wife will be named to the Seafood Hall of Fame; and an op-ed supports the Magnuson-Stevens Act. … More Info »

The potential of the Gulf of Maine

In the August 2016 issue of National Fisherman, Chairman of the Board of Diversified Communications, publisher of National Fisherman, Daniel Hildreth asks “what is the potential of the Gulf of Maine to support a healthy marine ecosystem and abundant fish stocks?” He thinks that we can find the answer by permanently protecting Cashes Ledge as marine national monument. … More Info »

Fishing Groups Exaggerate Economic Impacts of a New England Marine National Monument

The New England Coral Canyons and Seamounts Area holds remarkable ecologic value—ancient deep sea coral gardens, abundant and diverse marine mammal populations, as well as sea turtles and sea birds, and an array of rare and unusual marine species. The area is also distinguished by how little fishing actually occurs there. It is truly one of the least fished areas on the U.S. Atlantic Seaboard. That’s why I have to call out erroneous claims that creating a marine national monument in New England’s Coral Canyons and Seamounts would have “devastating economic impacts” on any fishery or port in New England. The facts simply contradict those claims. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, June 3

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, NOAA Fisheries releases its annual economics report; groundfishermen start to use electronic monitoring; the chairman of the House Committee on Natural Resources visits New Bedford; police find hundreds of illegal sea bass; NOAA recovers scallop survey camera; Sara Rademaker grows elvers into eels; and Maine’s elver harvest tops $13 million as the season winds down. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, January 12

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, Brown’s Alumni Magazine highlights Cashes Ledge as “The Wonder Down Under”; the Center for Coastal Studies spots the first right whale of the winter season; a bipartisan group of New England legislators send a letter to NOAA about the at-sea monitoring program; and Maine’s Marine Resources Committee will hold a hearing on a new lobster license bill. … More Info »

A Look Back at 2015

2015 seems to have gone by in the blink of an eye, and you can bet that’s because it was quite the busy year for New England fisheries and ocean issues. Now, it’s that time to look back on the last twelve months and remind ourselves of the important topics that we have highlighted on Talking Fish. … More Info »

A Call for Protections

The Gulf of Maine is warming fast — faster than almost any other ocean area in the world. To say this is alarm­ing is an understatement, and action is needed today to permanently protect large areas of the ocean, which scientists say is one of the best buffers against the disastrous effects of climate change. To that end, a diverse group of ma­rine-oriented businesses, hundreds of marine scientists, aquaria, conservation organizations and members of the public are calling on the Obama administration to designate the Cashes Ledge Closed Area and the New England Coral Can­yons and Seamounts as the first Marine National Monuments in the Atlantic. (Originally published in National Fisherman) … More Info »

Congressman Boehlert: New England’s ocean treasures deserve protection

This post is an excerpt from an opinion piece in The Patriot Ledger, in which former Rep. Sherwood Boehlert (Republican, former Chair of the House Science Committee) expresses his support of marine national monument designation for the New England Coral Canyons and Seamounts. … More Info »