Tagged Marine Mammal Protection Act

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, July 19

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, a Massachusetts state fisheries survey is underway in the Gulf of Maine; a federal appeals court rejects U.S. Navy sonar-use rules; Lisa Moore is diving into seaweed farming; ASMFC will host a conference call on Atlantic herring management area 1A; and Maine Lobster dives in Washington D.C. … More Info »

The Hooded Seal – Battling Foes with a Bladder Nose

For the past six weeks, we’ve stayed true to our name and featured nothing but fish. But this week, we couldn’t resist sharing this super adorable, territorial, and insanely weird Gulf of Maine marine mammal visitor – the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata). … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, January 10

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Connecticut Surfcasters Association calls for strengthening the Magnuson-Stevens Act; new research says minimum size limits may be flawed and big fish should be protected, too; rough conditions lead to a rocky trip for Gloucester fishermen; the comment period on new bluefin tuna regulations ends; elver fishermen are still split on methods to reduce catch; the decline of Maine shrimp and boom of Maine lobster are both linked to warming water; NRDC releases a report on marine mammal bycatch by foreign fisheries, but WWF Canada takes issue with its assertion that Canadian lobster and crab fisheries hurt right whales. … More Info »

Wrong Move for Right Whales

A pending decision on fishing for cod and other groundfish in New England has big implications for marine mammals including some of the most endangered animals in our waters, the North Atlantic right whale. … More Info »

Booming New England Seal Population Creates a Management Challenge

Congress passed the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) in 1972, forty years ago. Intended to slow the precipitous decline of marine mammal populations due to human activities, the act prohibited the killing, harassment, or excessive disturbance of marine mammals in United States waters. For seals in New England—mainly harbor seals and gray seals—the MMPA’s protections effected a massive boom in population. … More Info »