Tagged lawsuits

Commonwealth Loses Lawsuit on Lower Catch Limits

With a court decision released on April 8 which denied the Commonwealth’s claims, Coakley’s lawsuit has run its predicted course. It’s time to recognize that we need real solutions such as stopping overfishing, protecting habitat, reducing bycatch and improving ocean management. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, April 11

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, a slew of legal decisions on groundfish regulations; new research suggests more than 20% of seafood imported into the US is caught illegally; the Senate ratifies treaties to cut down on pirate fishing; environmental groups sue to expand protected habitat for right whales; ecosystem-based management could help respond to climate change; GMRI and the Bigelow Lab compete for funding for real-time monitoring; scallop fisheries in Maine and Nantucket Bay have a strong year; recovering alewife populations may mean a new fishery, too; Maine’s elver season begins with new regulations; an effort to clean up ghost gear is successful. … More Info »

Court Issues Decisions on NOAA’s Fishing Rules

On Friday, the U.S. District Court in Washington, DC issued a pair of rulings concerning NOAA’s proposals for allowing new fishing in long standing protected areas and increasing catch levels above legal limits. The rulings were in response to challenges brought by Conservation Law Foundation with Earthjustice. … More Info »

CLF, EJ to NMFS: Protect Habitat, End Overfishing and Bring Back Cod

Reinforcing the need to protect vital ocean habitat areas and end overfishing of New England’s severely depleted groundfish, the Conservation Law Foundation and Earthjustice filed a pair of lawsuits in federal district court challenging the shortsighted and damaging groundfish regulations developed by the New England Fishery Management Council and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the 2013 fishing year. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 31

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, Martha Coakley sues NMFS to raise catch limits; Oceana sues to increase observer coverage; Maine’s elver season ends; Vice Magazine interviews Carlos Rafael; Maine lawmakers consider a bill to eliminate penalties for groundfish boats catching lobster; NOAA develops an updated market news website. … More Info »

Fire, Ready, Aim: Attorney General Martha Coakley Launches Unguided Missile

Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley announced yesterday at a press conference on the Boston Fish Pier that the Commonwealth intends to sue the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), arguing that legal catch limits the federal government has set for cod, flounder and other groundfish equates to a “death penalty” for the Massachusetts fishing industry. The Attorney General is once again wrong on the law and wrong on the facts. … More Info »

CLF lawsuit to protect alewives in Maine

Last week, CLF filed a lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in an effort to overturn a Maine law that has prevented the alewife, a key forage fish, from accessing its native habitat in the St. Croix River in Maine. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the news – Friday, March 16

This week’s roundup of interesting fish stories: a stop-motion video of where your sushi is coming from; fish is high on the list of disease-causing imported foods; a federal district court judge rules to protect river herring; and groundfish populations may have been overestimated in the 2008 stock assessments. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, March 9

Some interesting news we’ve been reading this week: Senator Kerry introduces a bill to fund fishery research, the government and CLF support Amendment 16 in the Court of Appeals, author Paul Greenberg shares his current fish choices, and a roundup of this weekend’s ocean and fish-related events. … More Info »

Fishermen and Conservationists Forced to Federal Courts for River Herring Help

Roger Fleming is an attorney with Earthjustice. Roger has been working in fisheries law in New England and Washington, D.C. since 2001. He is an expert on the requirements of the Magnuson-Stevens Act (MSA) and related ocean conservation laws.  He … More Info »