Tagged habitat protection

Ancient Deep Sea Corals Need Protection From Modern Threats

Deep-sea coral researcher, Sandra Brooke, has traveled far and wide—including four trips in Alvin plus journeys in other submersible vehicles—to study these fragile organisms, which grow in a variety of formations and can live for thousands of years. … More Info »

A Review of 2016 on Talking Fish

Many of us, Talking Fish included, are ready to leave 2016 behind and wish for the best in the New Year. But it’s still valuable to reflect on the past year and review some of the major topics that we covered around New England’s fisheries. Merriam Webster chose “surreal” as the 2016 word of the year; it seems a similar sentiment can be applied to the world of New England fisheries in 2016, as we encountered many ups and downs throughout the year. … More Info »

The Well-Done, the Wait-and-See, and the Do-Your-Job: NEFMC Approves 2017 Management Priorities

Last week, the New England Fishery Management Council released its approved 2017 management priorities. Some priorities will contribute towards significant progress for New England’s fisheries, for some it’s too early to tell, and others were, once again, pushed off. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, December 20

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, NEFMC sets 2017 priorities; NOAA Fisheries releases Northeast Regional Climate Action Plan; plan for imperiled shark doesn’t please all conservationists; two fisheries achieve certification from the Marine Stewardship Council; and an Atlantic Ocean area the size of Virginia is protected from deep-sea fishing. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, November 29

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, an effort to protect deep-sea coral habitat has the lobster industry on alert; Rhode Island fishermen and scientists study the impact of the new offshore wind farm on fisheries; the Codfather asks the court to split his and his co-defendant’s cases; ocean acidification threatens local shellfish industry; and lobstermen are wanted to test a new life vest. … More Info »

A Vote To Be Thankful For: Council Says No Lobster and Crab Exemption from Coral Amendment

It is important to acknowledge when a good management decision has been made, and last week the New England Fishery Management Council did just that. For the second time, the Council voted against a motion that would have exempted the lobster and crab pot/trap fisheries in the Gulf of Maine from analysis in the draft Omnibus Deep-Sea Coral Amendment, notwithstanding barely-veiled warnings of civil disobedience from some lobster quarters in Maine. The vote was the right one. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, October 25

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, NOAA Fisheries announces a new NEFSC Director; the New York Times highlights successful dam removals in Maine; tropical fish arrive in Cape Cod waters; Gorton’s Seafood taps into consumer demand to meet new market challenges; lowly soft sediments are essential for productive fisheries; and a U.S. court say animals can be listed as threatened if climate change poses a risk. … More Info »

Optimum Yield for the Environment and All of Us

There is no shortage of historic firsts for the Atlantic Ocean. From the European discoveries of New England’s vast cod abundance that launched colonial America’s first industry to Marconi’s first trans-Atlantic wireless transmission to Lindberg’s harrowing trans-Atlantic flight, the Atlantic … More Info »

Looking out for our future: Obama designates the first Atlantic Marine National Monument

Today, President Obama will announce designation of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, recognizing the area for its scientific importance and making history for our region and nation. The president’s action, which is an authority granted to him by Congress under the Antiquities Act, will create the only landscape-scale, fully protected marine area in the U.S. Atlantic Ocean – preserving this area now and forever. … More Info »

The Plight of the Puffin: Protect Our Fish, Our Birds, and Our Ocean Ecosystem

This summer, sadly, the puffin chicks on Machias Seal Island are starving due to a food shortage. As reported by the Portland Press Herald, typically 60 percent of nests produce fledglings –birds that fly off to sea at the end of summer. Only 12 percent of nests produced fledglings this year; that’s just 320 chicks. Worse yet, the chicks are undersized and the scientists studying the colony do not expect them to survive to breeding age. What’s causing the food shortage on Machias Seal Island resulting in the worst breeding season on record, and what can we do to help? … More Info »