Tagged habitat protection

Celebrating the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts

Happy Anniversary! This Saturday, September 15th, marks two years since President Obama designated the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, providing full and permanent protection for this remarkable ecosystem for generations to come. … More Info »

New England Fishery Council Considers a Clam Dredge Exemption

Whether on a warm summer evening or a frigid winter night, a good bowl of New England clam chowder always hits the spot. Unfortunately, the large scale clamming that goes into producing a bowl of clam chowder is one of the most destructive forms of fishing there is. And now, the clam industry in New England seems to be getting special treatment despite its impact on ocean habitat. … More Info »

Fishery Council’s Coral Protections Are Progress, Though More Could Have Been Done

Last week, the New England Fishery Management Council approved the Omnibus Deep-Sea Coral Amendment. Overall, this amendment is a win for New England’s ocean, protecting more than 25,000 square miles of fragile seafloor habitat. But we can’t help but examine the process behind this management decision. … More Info »

Op-ed: Preserve Cashes Ledge and save fish

This post is an op-ed that was featured in the Climate Change Column of the Ipswich Chronicle. The author is Charlotte Kahn, an Ipswich resident and retired researcher/writer. … More Info »

A Bright Day for Deep-Sea Corals

For a deep-sea coral that can survive for centuries, not every day is remarkable. But last week was special for those corals that live in the deep waters off the U.S. mid-Atlantic states. The colorful, fragile marine animals are now part of the Frank R. Lautenberg Deep-Sea Coral Protection Area, under a rule drafted by the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council and issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). … More Info »

Ancient Deep Sea Corals Need Protection From Modern Threats

Deep-sea coral researcher, Sandra Brooke, has traveled far and wide—including four trips in Alvin plus journeys in other submersible vehicles—to study these fragile organisms, which grow in a variety of formations and can live for thousands of years. … More Info »

A Review of 2016 on Talking Fish

Many of us, Talking Fish included, are ready to leave 2016 behind and wish for the best in the New Year. But it’s still valuable to reflect on the past year and review some of the major topics that we covered around New England’s fisheries. Merriam Webster chose “surreal” as the 2016 word of the year; it seems a similar sentiment can be applied to the world of New England fisheries in 2016, as we encountered many ups and downs throughout the year. … More Info »

The Well-Done, the Wait-and-See, and the Do-Your-Job: NEFMC Approves 2017 Management Priorities

Last week, the New England Fishery Management Council released its approved 2017 management priorities. Some priorities will contribute towards significant progress for New England’s fisheries, for some it’s too early to tell, and others were, once again, pushed off. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, December 20

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, NEFMC sets 2017 priorities; NOAA Fisheries releases Northeast Regional Climate Action Plan; plan for imperiled shark doesn’t please all conservationists; two fisheries achieve certification from the Marine Stewardship Council; and an Atlantic Ocean area the size of Virginia is protected from deep-sea fishing. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, November 29

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, an effort to protect deep-sea coral habitat has the lobster industry on alert; Rhode Island fishermen and scientists study the impact of the new offshore wind farm on fisheries; the Codfather asks the court to split his and his co-defendant’s cases; ocean acidification threatens local shellfish industry; and lobstermen are wanted to test a new life vest. … More Info »