Tagged habitat

Atlantic Herring Deserve Protection Along New England’s Coast

Atlantic herring are vital to coastal ecosystems on the East Coast as prey for a wide variety of marine wildlife. This September, the New England Fishery Management Council will decide how to protect herring in coastal waters from intensive industrial fishing, and how to change the way catch limits are calculated for this critical fish. The Council should vote to protect waters out to 50 miles from shore, and set catch limits that reflect herring’s value to the ecosystem. … More Info »

A Chance to Protect More Coral – Will the Council Take it?

Next week, the New England Fishery Management Council will take final action on the Omnibus Deep-Sea Coral Amendment. For the canyons region south of Georges Bank, there is an opportunity to strike a balance between protections for coral and fishing effort. … More Info »

Marine National Monuments Make Sense

On Wednesday, September 29, members of the U.S. House Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans discussed and heard testimony from witnesses on potential Marine National Monument designations in the Atlantic Ocean and off the coast of Alaska. As New England Aquarium CEO Nigella Hillgarth says in her recent op-ed, “Let’s hope they also heard the urgency of acting before it is too late to set aside some unique and special places in our oceans for the benefit of current and future generations.” … More Info »

Diverse Stakeholders Voice Their Support at NOAA Town Hall Meeting

Last night, stakeholders from around New England gathered at a town hall meeting in Providence, RI to provide comment to NOAA on a possible Marine Monument designation in the Atlantic Ocean. Overall, speakers commented largely in favor of permanent protection for the Cashes Ledge Closed Area and the New England Coral Canyons and Seamounts. … More Info »

Southern New England’s Worst Year in History for River Herring Raises Concerns at Sea

Fisheries officials and watershed conservation groups have tallied the spring migratory runs of river herring, and in parts of southern New England, 2015 likely will go down as a particularly terrible year for these critically important forage fish. Reports from across Connecticut and Rhode Island show the number of migrating fish declining dramatically compared with recent years, leading one prominent biologist to call this year “the worst in history” in his state. … More Info »

Celebrating New England’s Oceans on World Oceans Day

This Sunday is World Oceans Day, an international event to celebrate and honor the ocean. World Oceans Day is a global event, but we thought we’d bring it back home to New England by celebrating the incredible marine habitat in the Gulf of Maine. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 23

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the FAO releases its State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture Report; river herring run across New England; NEFSC releases a new Ecosystem Advisory showing high sea surface temperatures; the NEFMC releases the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Omnibus Habitat Amendment; a new NOAA report shows the importance of shallow-water bottom habitat; volunteers count horseshoe crabs; Maine indefinitely closes part of the lower Penobscot to lobster fishing due to mercury contamination; a Maine lobsterman is charged for possessing undersized lobsters; Duxbury’s oyster farms thrive; Jon Grabowski develops a framework to evaluate fishing gear impacts on habitat types; sand lance return to Stellwagen and bring humpback whales with them. … More Info »

IPCC Highlights Ocean Warming

The latest report from the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) includes a greater focus on what climate change is doing to our oceans than have past reports from these Nobel-laureate scientists, and there’s a good reason for that. The oceans have been absorbing the bulk of the heat from a changing climate and are beginning to show the effects of that warming. … More Info »

Nature Study Shows Fish Feeling Heat from Global Warming

Map of East Coast

A study featured in the current issue of the journal Nature reveals that ocean warming has already affected fisheries around the world over the past four decades as fish populations shift in response to changing sea temperatures. The study is a stark reminder that climate change is a serious challenge in the here and now, not off in the distant future. It’s time for fisheries managers to start acting on that. … More Info »

70,000 Citizens, 100 Scientists Want New England’s Waters Protected

More than a hundred prominent scientists are urging federal officials to prevent the return of damaging, bottom trawl fishing to waters that have protected fish habitat and spawning areas in New England for nearly two decades. The scientists aren’t the only ones speaking up. More than 70 thousand people sent comments opposing the proposal. … More Info »