Tagged Gulf of Maine

A Rollercoaster of Demand for Atlantic Pollock

Last week, we featured a shark, and before that, a pretty little rosefish. But today, we have a real fish’s fish for you – a greenish, scaly, schooling creature with barbels and a classic fishy silhouette – the Atlantic pollock. … More Info »

Acadian Redfish – Consume Regularly for a Healthy Ocean

You may also recognize redfish by the name “ocean perch,” but they are not, in fact, perch (genus Perca); they are actually rockfish (genus Sebastes). Literally, these guys love rocks…and mud, and clay. Basically, they love bottom substrates. … More Info »

Atlantic Halibut – Don’t Let the Googly Eyes Fool You

Today, we’re talking about a monstrous flatfish – the voracious, predacious Atlantic halibut. Like all flatfish, Atlantic halibut lie on their left sides, giving them a goofy, almost crooked appearance. But don’t be fooled – their mouths gape all the way back to their eyes and are lined with sharp, curved teeth. … More Info »

NEFMC’s “Knockout Blow for American Fish Stocks”

New England fishery managers dealt the “one-two punch to the Georges Bank and Gulf of Maine cod stocks [that] may be the knockout blow,” says Oceana Fisheries Campaign Manager Gib Brogan. Brogan’s op-ed in the New York Times criticizes two most recent actions taken by the New England Fishery Management Council: 1) the drastic reduction of protected ocean habitat in New England and 2) the request for suspension of at-sea on-board fisheries monitors. … More Info »

Out of the Blue: Diversify Your P(a)late

While seafood is imported into the U.S. to meet consumer demand for shrimp, salmon, tilapia, and canned tuna, many sustainable species within domestic waters don’t show up on people’s plates. A Huffington Post article describes these domestic species as “underappreciated, underutilized species abundant at docks all around the country. Some call them trash fish, they’re anything but; they are simply underloved.” … More Info »

Consider the Lobster Price: How Climate Change Could Affect Your Lobster Roll

Lobster prices are on the higher end this summer, and scientists are pointing to cooler water temperatures as the cause. Don’t let this fool you, though. Ocean temperatures are still on the rise, and our lobster industry is still at risk. … More Info »

Oil and Gas Drilling: A Threat from Neighboring Waters

A recent proposal for offshore oil production in Canada poses a real threat to New England’s marine environment. The Shelburne Basin Venture Exploration Drilling Project’s proposed lease blocks are located directly adjacent to the northeast peak of Georges Bank. … More Info »

Study Commission Nears Final Recommendations to Counter Ocean Acidification

The sixteen member commission empowered by the Maine legislature to conduct a brief, six month investigation into the effects of coastal and ocean acidification on fish and shellfish commercially harvested in Maine nears the end of its term and recommends further study and other measures to immediately begin to address the impacts of ocean acidification. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, November 7

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NEFMC announced Omnibus Habitat Amendment 2 public hearings; Maine voters approved the Maine Marine Business Bond; Martha’s Vineyard scallop season starts strong; the Gulf of Maine shrimp season is cancelled; ASMFC’s 73rd Annual Meeting summary is now available; at-sea processing of spiny dogfish is banned; ASMFC awarded the Captain David H. Hart Award; the fishing industry and NOAA find common ground to protect whales; CT Sea Grant provided funding for coastal research projects; WHOI will use a $1 million grant to study climate change impacts on Buzzards Bay; GMRI comments on the importance of data in fisheries management; a new online tool hopes to measure the effects of the Northeast catch share program; GMRI will be hosting a presentation on fish populations and ecology in the Gulf of Maine; ISSF is calling for 100% observer coverage for bluefin tuna; and Omega Protein released its first corporate sustainability report. … More Info »

Souring Seas: What Ocean Acidification Might Mean for New England

The Gulf of Maine could be the “canary in the coal mine” for acidifying oceans, according to one presenter at an event designed to get people in New England thinking about how souring seas might affect them. … More Info »