Tagged Gulf of Maine cod

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, January 16

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, two studies debated the health of our oceans and marine life; Gloucester fishermen are seeking a trade deal with NOAA; Commonwealth magazine interviewed John Bullard; lobstermen are extending their season; Gulf of Maine water temperatures were unusually high this fall; Maine fishermen favor reduced striped bass catch; Massachusetts issued the 2015 ocean plan; a Cape Cod town orders boat captains to stop clam dredging; MAFMC began public hearings for the Deep Sea Corals Amendment; the U.S. government adopted new regulations for seafood imports; ASMFC and NOAA Fisheries is funding two river herring research projects; NOAA Fisheries approved Framework Adjustment 52; NOAA Fisheries file proposed revisions to the Magnuson-Stevens Act in the federal register; and two NYTimes articles carried news of climate change this week. … More Info »

The Question Not Asked

On January 5th, Senators Markey and Warren sent a set of questions to Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration concerning Atlantic cod. Paraphrasing the Senators’ questions for purposes of space and simplification, here’s how I would answer them … More Info »

Tragedy of the New England Fishing Commons

Fisheries—especially New England fisheries—are a common example used to illustrate the tragedy of the commons, and a recent New York Times Op-ed titled “Where Have All the Cod Gone?” emphasizes just this. NOAA’s recent interim Gulf of Maine cod measures were an important step in addressing this problem, but if history tells us anything, more action is necessary. Habitat protection is one of the best ways to help fish stocks recover. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News –Friday, January 2

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NOAA released two reports on the impacts of climate change on Northeast fisheries; researchers are using underwater acoustics to study cod spawning activity; NOAA Fisheries clarified cod interim measures; European demand for Maine lobster is high; NEFMC is seeking vessels for shrimp surveys; Maine regulators closed two scallop areas; a new podcast features recent sea turtle strandings; ocean acidification is weakening mussel shells; NOAA established speed restriction zones to protect endangered whales; Buzzards Bay Coalition is working to remove a dam; GARFO released its 5-year plan for public comment; NMFS is seeking public comment on its environmental assessment of NEFSC research; Mass EEA approved Gloucester’s Harbor Plan; the federal spending bill included several fisheries provisions; and MSA reauthorization will continue in the 114th Congress. … More Info »

Talking Fish 2014: A Year in Review

As we close out 2014 and head into the New Year, it’s a good time to look back on the stories featured on Talking Fish and review some reader favorites. Many stories fell under the umbrella of ecosystem-based fisheries management, an issue that will certainly continue to be a hot topic in 2015. … More Info »

The New York Times Sounds Alarm on Ocean Warming—Will Fisheries Officials Listen?

A recent headline in The New York Times sums up what many New England coastal communities have been wrestling with for the past few years: “Waters Warm, and Cod Catch Ebbs in Maine.” The piece concludes that the implications of this warming “should prompt the fishermen and regulators alike to plan for change before it arrives.” This is exactly what scientists have been telling New England’s fisheries managers to do in regard to an important decision that is pending. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, November 21

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NEFMC cut the cod quota for the 2015 fishing year; Gulf of Maine lobstermen are exempt from cod closures; EDF is calling for 100% monitoring of groundfish boats; local cod prices are expected to rise; Charlie Baker voices support for local fishermen; Gloucester looks to balance fishing with tourism; NOAA Fisheries released Multispecies Framework 52 for public comment; NOAA Fisheries proposed 2015 fishing year specifications; NEFMC expanded scallop closures; ICCAT increased the bluefin tuna quota; Maine seafood suppliers are low on shrimp for the winter season; Maine fishermen are banking on the Portland Fish Exchange renovation; a PhD student is studying river herring migration; Great Bay oyster restoration is proving successful; a Maine-based company is developing yellowtail aquaculture; scientists discussed US-based eel aquaculture; and a new library exhibit in Providence features artwork from 19th century whaling ships. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, November 14

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NOAA announced Gulf of Maine cod and haddock emergency measures; former deputy director of NMFS reassures that the science behind cod stock assessment is accurate; fishermen complain that lobstermen are exempt from new closure areas; NEFMC meeting is next week, November 17-20; University of Maine and NOAA Northeast Fisheries formed a new partnership for undergraduate students; The Gloucester Times will run a “Fish Tales” series next week; UMass Amherst researchers are tracking bluefin populations from the air; shellfish and herring were a hot topic at Wellfleet harbor conference; NOAA is transitioning to mail surveys for collecting recreational fishing data; U.S. seafood consumption is declining; the Cape Cod Fish Share is failing; nine endangered sea turtles were rescued from Cape Cod Bay; the number of dead zones are increasing; climate change is changing the Gulf of Maine ecosystem; the Blue Ocean Film Festival celebrated ocean conservation last week; NOAA established a new ocean exploration guide panel; a new USCG rule tries to stop invasive species; and a new technology was developed to monitor illegal fishing. … More Info »

Facing the Fishing Facts

The bad news is that the emergency measures put in place this week by NMFS’s regional director John Bullard are drastic. If the past is any prelude to the future, the worse news is that the measures will not be sufficient to stop the collapse of cod. … More Info »

Emergency Action Needed to Reverse Cod’s Collapse

Federal fisheries officials have a chance to halt the alarming decline of New England’s cod. But they can only do so if they take swift, bold action not only to reduce the number of cod killed by fishing but to increase protection for the places these fish need to feed, grow, and reproduce. Taking such actions will require farsighted leadership, in order to overturn the stubborn pattern of risky management decisions that have driven the region’s most traditionally important fish to historic lows. … More Info »