Tagged green crabs

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, September 7

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, Cape Ann Seafood Exchange reopens; NOAA declares seal die-off an ‘unusual mortality event’; Massachusetts raises fines for fishing poachers; local groups receive money to hunt green crabs; and the right whale spotted off Martha’s Vineyard likely died of entanglement. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, July 26

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, a new device is helping Maine fishermen avoid protected cod; lobstermen look for bait alternatives; NOAA grants $9 million for coastal habitat restoration projects; chefs cook up invasive green crabs; an undercover operation off Sandwich nets alleged striped bass poachers; federal prosecutors drop charges against bookkeeper for indicted fishing magnate; and Carlos Rafael buys more boats. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 15

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Maine Department of Marine Resources authorized fishermen to harvest and sell green crabs without licensing; a program at UMaine received $20 million in grant funding to study sustainable ecological aquaculture; a study led by UMass Dartmouth scientists found an increase in the Georges Bank scallop population; a Washington Post reporter asks if surges in lobster availability have altered its popularity; the Maine Department of Marine Resources announced the 2014-15 scallop fishing season will be the same as the previous one; NOAA approved Massachusetts’ grant application, providing the state with $6.3 million direct federal financial assistance; cleaner New York Harbor waters means more food for humpback whales.
… More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, July 18

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Boston Globe features Cashes Ledge; Maine grapples with its green crab problem; menhaden catch limits may mean higher bait prices; Massachusetts officials describe their plans to distribute federal fisheries disaster aid; the Maine Lobstermen’s Association may be released from a 1958 consent decree; Matt Jacobson is selected as the director of the Maine Lobster Marketing collaborative; Maine’s fishing stories are preserved through an oral history initiative; an abundance of jellyfish requires more research; Maine’s lobster season starts slowly due to a cold winter; Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations executive director Zeke Grader argues for a strong Magnuson-Stevens Act. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, February 14

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NERO becomes GARFO; Maine scrambles to find an elver management solution before the season begins in March; more opposition arises to Doc Hastings’ MSA reauthorization draft; a new deal allows oyster farmers to use floating gear; Maine closes more coastal scallop areas; NEFSC releases data from a cooperative flatfish survey; Massachusetts will lose $34 million in direct revenue due to depleted stocks; Massachusetts clammers meet to discuss green crabs; the Senate Oceans Caucus supports treaties to fight pirate fishing; a New Bedford Standard-Times piece focuses on homeless scallopers. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, February 7

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the House Natural Resources Committee holds a hearing on the Hastings Magnuson-Stevens reauthorization proposal; a DMF biologist says the lobster fishery south of Cape Cod won’t recover any time soon; federal fisheries disaster aid will be distributed as block grants to states; a Canadian businessman thinks he has a solution to Maine’s green crab problem; Cape Cod charter boats struggle with low black sea bass quota; NEFMC releases the agenda for its upcoming meeting; Bruce Tarr testifies in support of a new marketing fund for locally-caught seafood; new research highlights five factors that determine the success of MPAs in rebuilding fish populations. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, December 20

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the NEFMC discusses management priorities and habitat alternatives; Doc Hastings reveals a draft Magnuson-Stevens reauthorization bill; an economic analysis finds no evidence of excessive concentration of groundfish shares in New England; the Atlantic sea scallop fishery gains MSC certification against the wishes of some Maine scallopers; Maine continues to develop plans to cut the elver harvest; stakeholders meet to discuss the green crab invasion; a new report says aquaculture impacts can be minimal. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, November 22

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the NEFMC discusses observer coverage for the midwater trawl fleet; ICCAT meets to set bluefin limits; plankton are adapting poorly to climate change; Maine surveys its booming green crab population; an experimental survey finds more yellowtail than expected on Georges Bank; oyster farmers recover from a monthlong closure; Maine’s farmed salmon industry is recovering; the Center for Sustainable Fisheries discusses its plans for Magnuson; a letter to the Portland Press Herald says it’s time to address climate change and acidification; Forbes says striped bass anglers should voluntarily reduce catch; the EPA awards grants to repower eight lobster vessels. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, November 15

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, dogfish are plentiful, but consumers want cod; rising water temperatures bring new fish to New England; Maine introduces changes to elver management for 2014, but they may cause conflict; SMAST tests its video fish counting equipment; local groups team up to provide fishermen with low-cost pingers; the ASMFC says Maine shrimp are in bad shape; 38 lawmakers ask congressional leaders for fishing disaster aid; Maine tests new green crab control measures; a community development corporation helps a seafood cannery and the town it supports; scientists say ocean acidification could increase 170% by 2100; MAFMC member John McMurray calls for comprehensive river herring management. … More Info »

Mean, Green Eating Machines: The European green crab is “one of the world’s worst invasives”

Warming ocean temperatures have allowed green crabs to persist farther and farther north along the North American coastlines. Where cold winter chills used to keep its numbers in check, populations of green crabs are now booming places like the Gulf of Maine, and they are eating their way through our precious local seafood. … More Info »