Tagged forage fish

Local News Outlets Highlight Cape Fishermen’s Frustration with Herring Midwater Trawlers

The New England Fishery Management Council will resume its discussion on localized depletion of Atlantic herring at its meeting tomorrow. If you’re new to the issue of localized depletion, or need a refresher before tomorrow’s discussion (11/17), local Cape Cod news outlets, as well as past Talking Fish posts, have highlighted the concerns of local fishermen leading up to this week’s Council meeting. … More Info »

10 Reasons the Mid-Atlantic Council Should Manage River Herring and Shad in Federal Ocean Waters

Here are 10 reasons the council should vote to extend federal management to river herring and shad. … More Info »

Will River Herring and Shad Get Another Chance?

This week, the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council will vote on whether or not to add river herring and shad as a stock in the Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan. Doing so would provide river herring and shad the protections and rebuilding requirements required by federal law. Captain John McMurray offers his reasons why they should. … More Info »

What happens when you fish too long and too hard in one spot?

Science clearly supports a need for better ecosystem-based management. Localized depletion of forage fishes has real, adverse impacts on the forage species itself, on the rest of the ocean ecosystem, and on coastal communities. … More Info »

It’s Time for Action on Localized Depletion of Atlantic Herring

At its upcoming September 20-22 meeting, the Council should develop a range of alternatives to address localized depletion of Atlantic herring and its impacts. … More Info »

The Plight of the Puffin: Protect Our Fish, Our Birds, and Our Ocean Ecosystem

This summer, sadly, the puffin chicks on Machias Seal Island are starving due to a food shortage. As reported by the Portland Press Herald, typically 60 percent of nests produce fledglings –birds that fly off to sea at the end of summer. Only 12 percent of nests produced fledglings this year; that’s just 320 chicks. Worse yet, the chicks are undersized and the scientists studying the colony do not expect them to survive to breeding age. What’s causing the food shortage on Machias Seal Island resulting in the worst breeding season on record, and what can we do to help? … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, August 9

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, Maine closes its pogie fishery for first time ever; MAFMC protects unmanaged forage fish; porbeagle sharks will not be listed under the ESA; ASMFC approves development of new management measures for southern New England lobster; NEFMC live streams tomorrow’s SSC meeting; NOAA Fisheries issues a Fisheries Allocation Review Policy; NEFSC is accepting proposals for next year’s Atlantic Scallop RSA program; and NOAA Fisheries releases it final guidance on underwater acoustics. … More Info »

10 Reasons to Maintain the Atlantic Menhaden Catch Limit in 2017

At its Aug. 3 meeting, the Menhaden Management Board of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) will decide how much menhaden fishermen will be allowed to catch along the East Coast in 2017. If managers increase the catch limit, hundreds of millions more menhaden—often called “the most important fish in the sea” because of their role as food for predators—will be removed from the Atlantic Ocean. Here are 10 reasons the board should not raise the existing catch limit on these forage fish. … More Info »

Proposed rule a certain mistake for river herring and shad

The proposed 2016-2018 management measures for the Atlantic herring fishery set catch limits for Atlantic herring and adjust limits, or “catch caps,” on the amount of allowable river herring and shad bycatch by the herring fleet. The Magnuson-Stevens Act, as well as the Atlantic herring fishery management plan, are clear in their requirements and goals on the need to minimize bycatch to the extent practicable; however, NOAA Fisheries preliminarily supports the NEFMC’s recommendation to increase the river herring and shad catch caps. This is a clear inconsistency with the law and management goals. … More Info »

Inaction on Herring Amounts to Action in the Wrong Direction

At this week’s New England Fishery Management Council meeting, the Atlantic Herring Committee will report on Amendment 8 to the Atlantic Herring Fishery Management Plan (FMP). Amendment 8 focuses on long-term harvest strategies for Atlantic herring, including an “acceptable biological catch” control rule that explicitly accounts for herring’s role in the ecosystem, as well as measures to address localized depletion. Upon review of the Herring Committee’s recent investigations, the Council must take concrete action to prevent further inshore resource declines while scientific analysis on the impacts of localized depletion continues. … More Info »