Tagged fisheries science

Ocean Acidification in the Northeast: Cod Can’t Catch a Break!

Ocean acidification, known to scientists as “the other CO₂ problem”, may cause changes to our marine fauna—including severely depleted cod—that we have only begun to wrap our heads around. Good science and planning will be necessary to help coastal ecosystems and economies adapt to this worrying trend. … More Info »

On Climate, Cod, Copepods, and Conjunctions

The warming of New England’s waters due to climate change is affecting the availability of food for larval cod, according to a study by scientists at NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center. Fortunately, two upcoming events promise to expand the conversation about climate change and fishing. Unfortunately, some media coverage of this important science does a great disservice by misrepresenting the results. … More Info »

At Sustaining Coastal Cities Conference, Scientists Point to Ocean Solutions

Last week, ocean users and marine scientists gathered at Northeastern University to hear an excellent series of talks on the future of ocean sustainability at the Sustaining Coastal Cities Conference. With a particular focus on climate change and the health of fisheries, the conference brought global issues home to New England and demonstrated this region’s strength in marine science. … More Info »

Nature Study Shows Fish Feeling Heat from Global Warming

Map of East Coast

A study featured in the current issue of the journal Nature reveals that ocean warming has already affected fisheries around the world over the past four decades as fish populations shift in response to changing sea temperatures. The study is a stark reminder that climate change is a serious challenge in the here and now, not off in the distant future. It’s time for fisheries managers to start acting on that. … More Info »

The Fish are Talking, but Can We Listen?

The scientists who study cod populations have tried a lot of different ways to figure out where cod aggregate and to observe their behavior, like trawl surveys, sonar, and even underwater video cameras. But recently, a team of federal and state fisheries scientists have developed a new way to observe groups of cod. Rather than watching them, they’re listening to them—and they’re hearing some pretty interesting stories that could help us protect this depleted species. … More Info »

70,000 Citizens, 100 Scientists Want New England’s Waters Protected

More than a hundred prominent scientists are urging federal officials to prevent the return of damaging, bottom trawl fishing to waters that have protected fish habitat and spawning areas in New England for nearly two decades. The scientists aren’t the only ones speaking up. More than 70 thousand people sent comments opposing the proposal. … More Info »

CLF Calls to Shut Down New England Cod Fishery

Yesterday the story of New England’s cod fishery took another tragic turn when the New England Fishery Management Council voted to drastically cut catch limits for New England’s two cod stocks—Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank cod—by 77 and 61 percent, respectively. Now is not the time for denial. It is not the time for timid decisions and unconscionable risk. It is time to make the painful, necessary steps towards a better future for fishing in New England. Rather than arguing over the scraps left after decades of mismanagement, we should shut the cod fishery down and protect whatever cod are left. … More Info »

“The Fish Just Aren’t There.”

There is no question that the expected reductions in annual catch limits (ACLs) will be difficult for an industry already in a declared disaster. But while these cuts for cod and haddock limits have grabbed headlines, the real story is that there simply aren’t enough fish. The science, the catch data and many fishermen say the populations of many important species are at or near all-time lows. Fishery regulators are eager to cushion the blow to those whose livelihoods are at risk. Unfortunately, many proposals intended to help fishermen do not address the real problem—a lack of fish—and instead risk further harm to weakened fish populations. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, January 25th

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the SSC sets 2013 Allowable Biological Catch for three stocks; John Bullard denies a request for interim measures; the New England shrimp season begins; the Marine Fisheries Institute will review the groundfish stock assessment process; concern over a loss of fisheries advocates in Congress; an investigation into fisheries rulemaking finds flaws in recordkeeping. … More Info »

Recent paper points to a need for improved ecosystem modeling

Map of East Coast

Fisheries managers in the U.S., and increasingly around the world, use stock assessments and scientific information about fish populations to set catch limits for fisheries. It is typically assumed that more adult fish means more reproduction, and thus more fish available for us to harvest. But the authors of a paper published last week by several prominent fisheries biologists found that the productivity of fish stocks can be nearly independent of the abundance of adults, and is influenced by other factors. … More Info »