Tagged fisheries management

Talking Turkey About Fish

The air of optimism and relief that accompanied the creation of the sector system two years ago, the “end of overfishing” in New England, and the predictions that many stocks were rebuilding to high levels had presaged a new and better future. Any optimism is now gone, and in hindsight it seems ridiculous. The fox is not only guarding the chicken house; he is systematically demolishing it. … More Info »

Maine fisherman Terry Alexander works to revive redfish

Terry Alexander is a fourth generation fisherman from Harpswell, Maine. Alexander has teamed up with other fishermen, scientists, and the Gulf of Maine Research Institute to help revive redfish fishing in New England. NOAA’s Monica Allen caught up with Terry Alexander to learn more about the redfish revival and how sector management is working for him. … More Info »

Small Fish, Big Opportunity

Over the past several months, a collection of conservationists, anglers and others have come together to urge federal policymakers to safeguard the array of species that serve as the foundation for a healthy marine ecosystem. And, to their credit, regional fishery managers on both coasts heeded the message these advocates delivered: If we want to protect the oceans, it makes sense to start small. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, October 26

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, scientists and environmental groups speak out against a proposed fisheries data confidentiality rule; Carl Safina and Andrew Read argue against a delay for a gillnetting closure; The New York Times discusses the damaging effects of trawling; fishing communities prepare for Hurricane Sandy, a coalition celebrates the removal of a dam in Taunton; a new bill would allow spearfishing for stripers in MA; NMFS proposes more relaxed regulations for dogfish; Ellen Pikitch argues for precautionary, ecosystem-based fisheries management. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, October 12

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, some fishermen continue to oppose 10-year rebuilding requirements for overfished stocks; a new initiative will help Maine fishermen seeking to enter the groundfish fleet; a dead finback whale creates a challenge in Boston Harbor, John Bullard supports limits on catch share accumulation, cod brings large trawlers to inshore waters; a new article discusses the history and restoration of alewife populations. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, October 5

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, fish stocks lacking scientific assessments are severely depleted; community-supported fisheries provide economic opportunity for fishermen; a sustainable seafood festival in Boston; Seacoast Online explores the tension between fishermen and scientists over stock assessments; sharks hurt Cape beach revenues; the History Channel puts the spotlight on New England fishermen; fish are likely to reach smaller sizes due to warming water; ocean acidification threatens ecosystems and fisheries. … More Info »

The Bottom Line: Historic Moment for Menhaden

By Lee Crockett of the Pew Environment Group. Menhaden numbers have plunged nearly 90 percent over the past 25 years, and the regulators responsible for their management will soon make a critical decision. In December, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) could finally help the depleted population recover by setting a coastwide, science- based annual catch limit. … More Info »

Illegal and Wrong

Wednesday’s New England Fishery Management Council’s Groundfish Committee meeting was … depressing. As the expression goes, just when I think I am seeing light at the end of the tunnel I realize that it is the headlights of the on-coming bus. Once again, current events—bad as they are—seem about to be exploited to produce an even more dismal future. The topic was throwing open the decades-long fishery closed areas to exploitation again. … More Info »

Booming New England Seal Population Creates a Management Challenge

Congress passed the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) in 1972, forty years ago. Intended to slow the precipitous decline of marine mammal populations due to human activities, the act prohibited the killing, harassment, or excessive disturbance of marine mammals in United States waters. For seals in New England—mainly harbor seals and gray seals—the MMPA’s protections effected a massive boom in population. … More Info »

More Congressional Fisheries Misdirection

Despite its caption, the “Transparent and Science-Based Fishery Management Act of 2012,” H.R. 6350, introduced by U.S. Representative John Runyun of New Jersey just hours before Congress adjourned for summer recess on August 2nd is a misguided piece of legislation. … More Info »