Tagged ecosystem-based fisheries management

Baked Cod – The Path Forward in an Era of Climate Change

Last week’s Science paper on the impacts of rapidly increasing ocean temperatures on cod’s reduced productivity and its long-term rebuilding potential in New England was sobering. It confirmed both the theoretical predictions associated with climate change and the recent scientific federal, state, and Canadian trawl surveys that caught incredibly few cod. … More Info »

Fishing in Hot Water

Taking a broader approach to fisheries management allows for increased ecosystem resilience through adaptive management, which in turn can prepare our fisheries and fishermen for the impacts of climate change. Scientific studies continue to provide evidence of warming ocean waters being the product of climate change and excessive carbon pollution. The Gulf of Maine is warming faster than 99% of the world’s oceans, so being prepared MUST be a priority for Maine’s fishermen who rely on species that are dependent on cool waters. … More Info »

Council Makes a Wrong Move for River Herring

The New England Fishery Management Council has again shown that they are unwilling to protect river herring and shad at sea. Last week at their meeting in Plymouth, Massachusetts, the Council voted to increase the amount of river herring and shad that can be caught by the herring fleet, even though the current caps have not even been in place for one year, and no science was presented suggesting that these populations have recovered. … More Info »

Council Delivers Blow to River Herring in New England

The New England Fishery Management Council voted in favor of increasing river herring catch caps at its September 2015 meeting last week. This post provides an update to our readers following last week’s post, River Herring at Risk in New England Waters. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, September 29

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, NOAA Fisheries released a draft Ecosystem-Based Fishery Management Plan; New England fishermen worry about black sea bass; read the story of a 23-year old female fisherman; oysterman James Bloom is appointed to Connecticut’s Aquaculture Advisory Council; comments on reducing scallop fishing days will be accepted until Sunday; Cape Cod Times says national monument designation a boon for nature; and NEFSC announces its Strategic Science Plan 2016-2021. … More Info »

River Herring at Risk in New England Waters

While the New England Fishery Management Council has established yearly limits on the allowable river herring bycatch from the Atlantic herring fishery, the Council is currently considering an increase in these river herring catch caps. … More Info »

Why is Managing Fish in the World’s Oceans Like an Episode of ‘I Love Lucy’?

Fish scientist Jason Link says he often feels like he’s living the classic chocolate factory episode of the 1950s TV show “I Love Lucy,” in which Lucy and Ethel can’t wrap candies as fast as the conveyor belt spits them out. “We’re trying to keep up with rules on individual species whose populations are frequently changing. Our conveyor belt is moving faster and faster.” … More Info »

Of Sandeels and Tuna: We Need Your Help Getting Ahead of the Curve – John McMurray

The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council has started a scoping process for how to “initiate a regulatory action to prohibit the development of new, or expansion of existing, directed fisheries for unmanaged forage species until adequate scientific information is available to promote ecosystem sustainability.” The Council is looking for comments on eight specific questions, which John McMurray lists in his blog and offers his own opinions. … More Info »

Pew’s Josh Reichert: House bill severely undercuts nation’s progress in fisheries management

The United States’ status as a global leader in preventing overfishing and in rebuilding depleted populations of ocean fish is in jeopardy from an unexpected source: the U.S. House of Representatives. … More Info »

Atlantic Herring at the Center of a Ripple Effect

As expressed in the recent Associated Press article, Big Herring Catch off New England Comes with Worries, stakeholders regard Atlantic herring as a linchpin of the marine environment, with steady populations required to ensure the stability of many fisheries and industries. Given the extensive ecological and economic interdependencies surrounding Atlantic herring, the resource must be managed with an eye towards its vital functions and interactions throughout the marine ecosystem. … More Info »