Tagged ecosystem-based fisheries management

Celebrating 20 Years of Essential Fish Habitat Policy

The year 2016 marks a few noteworthy anniversaries: the 100th anniversary of Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity, the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, and Star Trek’s 50th birthday! And in the world of fisheries policy, perhaps the most significant anniversary – apart from the 40th anniversary of the Magnuson-Stevens Act celebrated earlier this month, of course – is the 20th anniversary of the establishment of Essential Fish Habitat policy. … More Info »

Inaction on Herring Amounts to Action in the Wrong Direction

At this week’s New England Fishery Management Council meeting, the Atlantic Herring Committee will report on Amendment 8 to the Atlantic Herring Fishery Management Plan (FMP). Amendment 8 focuses on long-term harvest strategies for Atlantic herring, including an “acceptable biological catch” control rule that explicitly accounts for herring’s role in the ecosystem, as well as measures to address localized depletion. Upon review of the Herring Committee’s recent investigations, the Council must take concrete action to prevent further inshore resource declines while scientific analysis on the impacts of localized depletion continues. … More Info »

Happy 40th Birthday, Magnuson-Stevens Act!

Today marks the 40th anniversary of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, our nation’s primary law governing fishing and fishery resources in the United States. The law is now up for reauthorization, meaning that Congress has the opportunity to build on the successes of our nation’s fisheries as well as make improvements where we face challenges. … More Info »

Atlantic Herring Management is Flawed; Here’s How to Improve it

Herring are also one of the most heavily fished species in U.S. Atlantic waters. Much of this fishing is done by industrial-sized ships known as midwater trawlers. The huge scale of fishing effort has created a challenge for the fisheries managers working to ensure that the herring population remains healthy enough to support fishing over the long term and that enough herring are available to feed the many animals that depend on them. … More Info »

Pacific Coast Commercial Fishing Ban Provides Template for Proactively Protecting Forage Fish Species Critical to Marine Ecosystem Health

NOAA Fisheries commendably finalized a ban on directed commercial fishing for several forage fish species, including Pacific sand lance, silversides, certain varieties of herring, smelt, and squid, off the coasts of California, Oregon, and Washington. As New England and other coastal regions throughout the country evaluate ecosystem-based fisheries management approaches, they would be wise to heed the preventative action adopted along the Pacific coast for forage fish species management. … More Info »

Seagrass Provides Lifeline for Fish and Coastal Economies

Seagrass provides food and shelter for thousands of species. But these flora are dying in vast tracts across the globe. Congress has an opportunity to improve protections for all marine habitats when it reauthorizes the primary law that governs U.S. ocean fishing, the Magnuson-Stevens Act. … More Info »

Climate Change Shuffles the Deck for Fishery Managers

In 2012 and 2013, sea temperatures along the New England coast spiked, shattering records that stretch back a century and a half. As the waters warmed, fishermen hauled in some unexpected catch, including species that are normally found far to the south. Although some of these unusual catches are likely just one-off events, scientists have found that many of these incidents indicate a larger and important trend of fish species moving as climate change heats our oceans. … More Info »

Magnuson-Stevens Act, ‘a good news story’

The Senate Subcommittee on Oceans, Atmosphere, Fisheries, and Coast Guard recently hosted a hearing in anticipation of the 40th Anniversary of the Magnuson-Stevens Act. Senators on the subcommittee examined the successes and opportunities for improvement of this very important law. The Honorable Samuel Rauch, Deputy Assistant Administrator for NOAA Regulatory Programs served as the sole witness giving testimony to and answering questions from the Senators. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, February 12

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, NOAA’s climate study demands a new approach to fishery regulation; the court battle continues for at-sea monitoring; UMass Dartmouth scientists improve cod counting technology; Massachusetts-based Impact Labs develops real-time oyster monitoring; ASMFC approves 23 percent harvest reduction for recreational black sea bass fishery; states schedule hearings on Jonah crab Draft Addendum I; NOAA announces five-year action plans for eight endangered marine species; and plastic microbead pollution harms oyster reproduction. … More Info »

Court Says Regulators Must Protect Keystone Species from Giant Trawlers

As victims of “bycatch,” river herring and shad populations have dwindled to less than 5 percent of their historic levels. A federal judge issued a ruling that could help protect these two keystone fish species. … More Info »