Tagged ecosystem-based fisheries management

Will River Herring and Shad Get Another Chance?

This week, the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council will vote on whether or not to add river herring and shad as a stock in the Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan. Doing so would provide river herring and shad the protections and rebuilding requirements required by federal law. Captain John McMurray offers his reasons why they should. … More Info »

Optimum Yield for the Environment and All of Us

There is no shortage of historic firsts for the Atlantic Ocean. From the European discoveries of New England’s vast cod abundance that launched colonial America’s first industry to Marconi’s first trans-Atlantic wireless transmission to Lindberg’s harrowing trans-Atlantic flight, the Atlantic … More Info »

New Research Shows a Bad Forecast for Cod in a Rapidly Changing Climate

This summer, two scientific articles examined the outlook for Atlantic cod populations in a rapidly changing climate, and unfortunately for an already struggling species in New England, the forecast is not so great. … More Info »

What happens when you fish too long and too hard in one spot?

Science clearly supports a need for better ecosystem-based management. Localized depletion of forage fishes has real, adverse impacts on the forage species itself, on the rest of the ocean ecosystem, and on coastal communities. … More Info »

It’s Time for Action on Localized Depletion of Atlantic Herring

At its upcoming September 20-22 meeting, the Council should develop a range of alternatives to address localized depletion of Atlantic herring and its impacts. … More Info »

The Plight of the Puffin: Protect Our Fish, Our Birds, and Our Ocean Ecosystem

This summer, sadly, the puffin chicks on Machias Seal Island are starving due to a food shortage. As reported by the Portland Press Herald, typically 60 percent of nests produce fledglings –birds that fly off to sea at the end of summer. Only 12 percent of nests produced fledglings this year; that’s just 320 chicks. Worse yet, the chicks are undersized and the scientists studying the colony do not expect them to survive to breeding age. What’s causing the food shortage on Machias Seal Island resulting in the worst breeding season on record, and what can we do to help? … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 12

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, the MAFMC approves an ecosystem-based management guidance document; Massachusetts promotes local seafood through a new marketing program; the “Good Catch!” campaign bolsters New England’s sustainable seafood businesses; the Ninth Circuit Court upholds federal fishery fees; why are New England’s wild blue mussels disappearing?; the Island Institute releases its lobster fishery characterization study; UMass Dartmouth forms a partnership with Iceland; meeting materials from ASMFC’s 2016 summer meeting are now available; NOAA Fisheries establishes international marine mammal bycatch criteria for U.S. imports; and an op-ed says protecting the NE coral canyons and seamounts is crucial to fisheries. … More Info »

10 Reasons to Maintain the Atlantic Menhaden Catch Limit in 2017

At its Aug. 3 meeting, the Menhaden Management Board of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) will decide how much menhaden fishermen will be allowed to catch along the East Coast in 2017. If managers increase the catch limit, hundreds of millions more menhaden—often called “the most important fish in the sea” because of their role as food for predators—will be removed from the Atlantic Ocean. Here are 10 reasons the board should not raise the existing catch limit on these forage fish. … More Info »

Fisheries and Fishermen: Part of the Ocean Plan Puzzle

On this World Oceans Day, let’s take a step back from the day-to-day workings of fisheries management to view New England’s ocean on a larger scale. Our region’s fish species, and the fishermen that rely on them, are part of a very busy, ever-changing environment, and although fishery managers only have authority over fishery resources, this idea is an important one to remember. … More Info »

Dock Talk: Ocean Planning

According to John Williamson, “Our priority as fishermen should be no further loss of [environment’s capability to produce fish for commercial and recreational fisheries.]…Regional Ocean Plans both attempt to improve consultation among agencies and with the fishing public, i.e., with fishermen, trade associations and the fishery management councils.” … More Info »