Tagged deep sea corals

Celebrating the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts

Happy Anniversary! This Saturday, September 15th, marks two years since President Obama designated the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, providing full and permanent protection for this remarkable ecosystem for generations to come. … More Info »

A Bright Day for Deep-Sea Corals

For a deep-sea coral that can survive for centuries, not every day is remarkable. But last week was special for those corals that live in the deep waters off the U.S. mid-Atlantic states. The colorful, fragile marine animals are now part of the Frank R. Lautenberg Deep-Sea Coral Protection Area, under a rule drafted by the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council and issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). … More Info »

Ancient Deep Sea Corals Need Protection From Modern Threats

Deep-sea coral researcher, Sandra Brooke, has traveled far and wide—including four trips in Alvin plus journeys in other submersible vehicles—to study these fragile organisms, which grow in a variety of formations and can live for thousands of years. … More Info »

A Vote To Be Thankful For: Council Says No Lobster and Crab Exemption from Coral Amendment

It is important to acknowledge when a good management decision has been made, and last week the New England Fishery Management Council did just that. For the second time, the Council voted against a motion that would have exempted the lobster and crab pot/trap fisheries in the Gulf of Maine from analysis in the draft Omnibus Deep-Sea Coral Amendment, notwithstanding barely-veiled warnings of civil disobedience from some lobster quarters in Maine. The vote was the right one. … More Info »

We Must Do More to Save Deep-Sea Corals

Less than 100 miles offshore from the heavily populated Eastern Seaboard lie submerged seascapes that look more like visions from another world than the cities and landmarks for which they are named. Most amazing, perhaps, are the living structures known as deep-sea corals that many of these animals depend upon for habitat. The Magnuson-Stevens Act is due for renewal—and the deep-sea corals illustrate why we need to update this important law. … More Info »

Protect New England’s Ocean Treasures

On Wednesday, September 2 the New England Aquarium and the National Geographic Society are hosting an evening of scientific exploration celebrating two of New England’s oceans treasures: the Cashes Ledge Closed Area and the New England Coral Canyons and Seamounts. … More Info »

Deep-Sea Corals Win Historic Protection

Federal fisheries officials in the Mid-Atlantic voted on June 10 to create the largest protected area in U.S. Atlantic waters, a roughly 38,000 square-mile region where scientists have found an abundance of deep-sea corals. … More Info »

Decision Time for Deep Corals in the Mid-Atlantic

On June 10, regional fisheries officials will have the chance to create the largest protected area in U.S. Atlantic waters when they vote on a proposal to help preserve deep-sea corals and the unique habitat these animals create. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 22

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, The White House says it will veto the House MSA Reauthorization bill; the amendment to revise national fisheries law reignites debate between industry and environmentalists; MAFMC will soon vote on the Deep Sea Coral Amendment; TNC works to restore 5,000 acres of native shellfish beds; researchers confirm reports of beluga whales; ASMFC evaluates the health of black sea bass population; NMFS announces proposed amendment to simplify Atlantic boat documentation; NOAA announces a new initiative to protect endangered species; “The President’s Salmon” tells the story of a past Atlantic salmon tradition; fishermen are on top of “Deadliest Jobs in America” list; and tickets are now on sale for the 4th Annual Boston Seafood Festival. … More Info »

Talking Corals

Corals are not just important for their own sake. They are important to the health of our ocean and the productivity of our fish populations. … More Info »