Tagged correcting myths

Focus going forward should be on making the New England Council and sector management work – not on repeating unsubstantiated arguments

Monday’s Boston field hearing of the Senate Committee of Commerce, Science, and Transportation was good political theater.  Senator Kerry and Senator Begich from Alaska, chair of the Committee, tried their best to create a constructive and positive atmosphere for the … More Info »

Breaking a System That Isn’t Broken?

Ken Stump is Policy Director of the Marine Fish Conservation Network. Not so long ago, New England’s historic groundfish fisheries were the poster child for chronic overfishing. Today, the region’s fisheries are becoming a good news story for the first … More Info »

Overfishing 101: How Science Helps Managers End Overfishing and Rebuild Depleted Stock Populations

Lee Crockett leads the Pew Environment Group’s efforts in Washington, D.C. to establish policies to end overfishing and promote sustainable fisheries management. This post, previously published on the  National Geographic blog, is the seventh in a series, “Overfishing 101.” Read … More Info »

Talking Fish urges Senator Brown to spend time fixing current problems instead of rehashing old complaints

Today, the Gloucester Times published an op-ed by Senator Scott Brown of Massachusetts in which the Senator charges NOAA actions and regulations with destroying fishermen’s livelihoods. Just yesterday, Talking Fish posted an opinion piece by John Sackton of Seafoodnews.com in … More Info »

Seafoodnews.com: Gloucester, New Bedford Mayors foolishly endorsing crazies in New England

Yesterday, Seafoodnews.com ran an editorial by publisher John Sackton expressing his views that the mayors of Gloucester and New Bedford, along with other outspoken critics of sector management in New England, are spending their time foolishly promoting conspiracy theories about … More Info »

Overfishing 101: Why ending overfishing is good for both fish and fishermen alike

Lee Crockett leads the Pew Environment Group’s efforts in Washington, D.C. to establish policies to end overfishing and promote sustainable fisheries management. This post, previously published on the Huffington Post and the National Geographic blog, is the sixth in a … More Info »

Do Special Interests Control Fisheries Management?

MYTH: The New England Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) is controlled by the environmental community. TRUTH: Fishing interests dominate the Council. Last week, a “Dear Colleague” letter and hearing request to the Committee on Natural Resources were sent out by The Honorable John … More Info »