Tagged bycatch

A Better Way to Protect Our Ocean Ecosystems

We can and must do better. It’s time that decision-makers and federal fisheries managers pursue broader policy solutions that will not only help restore individual species but also promote healthy and robust marine ecosystems—an approach known within scientific circles as ecosystem-based fisheries management. … More Info »

And the Beat Goes On

By Capt. Patrick Paquette. Despite over a decade of outcry from both the general public & multiple stakeholder groups within the fishing community, on this coming Thursday the New England Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) will once again be discussing the seemingly never ending question of how to monitor and regulate the very controversial fishing gear known as a “mid water trawl.” Many countries including Canada, with whom we share the Atlantic herring resource, have banned the use of this gear completely. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, January 17

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the new appropriations bill includes fisheries disaster funding; Eileen Sobeck is appointed assistant administrator for NOAA Fisheries; the New England Regional Planning Body will meet next week; port services business are feeling the pressure from catch limit cuts; right whales return to Cape Cod Bay unusually early; local fishermen tag cod to identify spawning areas; Maine clashes with tribes again over elver limits; ocean acidification is creating dead mud flats; NRDC pushes for stronger bycatch measures in Magnuson-Stevens; stakeholders meet to discuss electronic monitoring. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, January 10

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Connecticut Surfcasters Association calls for strengthening the Magnuson-Stevens Act; new research says minimum size limits may be flawed and big fish should be protected, too; rough conditions lead to a rocky trip for Gloucester fishermen; the comment period on new bluefin tuna regulations ends; elver fishermen are still split on methods to reduce catch; the decline of Maine shrimp and boom of Maine lobster are both linked to warming water; NRDC releases a report on marine mammal bycatch by foreign fisheries, but WWF Canada takes issue with its assertion that Canadian lobster and crab fisheries hurt right whales. … More Info »

A Big Step for Our Little Fish

In the coming month, members of the New England Fishery Management Council will try to jumpstart a stalled effort to adequately monitor the activity of the midwater trawl vessels that fish for Atlantic herring. The council was jolted into action by a controversial proposal during its last meeting in November when frustrated fishermen proposed a moratorium on midwater trawlers unless all herring vessels operated under the watch of a trained fisheries observer. While this motion failed, the debate it inspired was nothing short of a watershed moment for accountability within forage fisheries in New England. … More Info »

One Good Step for River Herring, Then a Stumble

There is ample science supporting measures that would prevent depleted river herring from being scooped up by the industrial trawlers targeting other fish such as Atlantic herring and mackerel. That’s why recent votes by federal and regional fisheries managers have been so frustrating. In the past month we’ve seen one good step forward followed by some serious stumbles. … More Info »

A Conspiracy Afloat?

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” – Upton Sinclair. There appears to be a conspiracy in our midst. Or so, some would think. Saving Seafood, “a 501(c)(6) association organized as a non-profit corporation funded by the fishing industry,” appears to have become rather discomposed by uncovering the fact that some people in New England believe that the practice of ripping up the ocean floor with heavy bottom trawling fishing gear might have deleterious effects on ocean fish and wildlife and the habitat that these species depend upon. … More Info »

Fisheries Scientists across the Yellow Line?

In discussions about how to set catch limits for yellowtail flounder some scientists may have crossed the line separating pure science from policy making.   Effective fisheries management rests upon objective guidance from the scientists serving on the Fishery Management Council’s … More Info »

Court Order Sets Clock Ticking for Action on River Herring

In a few weeks the New England Fishery Management Council will get a letter, probably a long one, explaining why the coming year will bring big changes to the way the council handles severely depleted river herring and shad. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, June 22

This week’s stories include: new regulations for the industrial Atlantic herring fleet to protect river herring and shad, Native American tribal support for the opening of the St. Croix River to alewives, a bill to fight illegal fishing, a study to map the seafloor of Long Island Sound, an objective look at New England fisheries and fishing communities, and an article about how London is working to achieve their commitment to serve only sustainable seafood at the 2012 Olympic Games. … More Info »