Tagged best available science

One That Didn’t Get Away: The Atlantic Sea Scallop and the Future of Fishing

During National Seafood Month, it is important to appreciate the tremendous benefits the Cape and seafood consumers across the country have enjoyed thanks to the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, which Congress is revisiting this year. In fact, without the science-based fisheries management required by this law, our rich heritage might have become ancient history. … More Info »

Two New Developments Could Boost Health of Fisheries and Our Ocean

Those of us who care about healthy oceans and fish populations are pleased to see two strong spotlights shine last week on ecosystem-based fishery management, or EBFM. As a reminder, the goal of EBFM is to better inform management decisions with a big-picture approach to fisheries management that uses existing data about where fish live, what they eat, what eats them, and what threats they face in order to ensure that ocean ecosystems and the fisheries they support are healthy and productive. … More Info »

Experts say: In the case for marine protection, the science begs for accelerated decision-making

The Earth is over 70% ocean, but our efforts to preserve our blue planet lag far behind terrestrial protections. Former NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco and fellow Oregon State University researcher Kirsten Grorud-Colvert published a paper in Science last week acknowledging recent global progress in ocean conservation but emphasizing the need to do much more. … More Info »

Ocean Planning 101

If you haven’t been plugged into the process, the term “ocean planning” can, for lack of a better term, confuse more than clarify. For those newbies out there passionate about the health of our oceans (you, I bet!) but confused about what ocean planning means for New England, consider this post your “Ocean Planning 101” crash course. … More Info »

Taking Stock of New England Fish: Part 4

TalkingFish.org interviews Mike Palmer, Research Fisheries Biologist in the Population Dynamics Branch of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center. In this post, Mike Palmer answers our questions about best available science and the challenges of conducting fish stock assessments. … More Info »