Posted in Science

Recent paper points to a need for improved ecosystem modeling

Map of East Coast

Fisheries managers in the U.S., and increasingly around the world, use stock assessments and scientific information about fish populations to set catch limits for fisheries. It is typically assumed that more adult fish means more reproduction, and thus more fish available for us to harvest. But the authors of a paper published last week by several prominent fisheries biologists found that the productivity of fish stocks can be nearly independent of the abundance of adults, and is influenced by other factors. … More Info »

What Single-Celled Diatoms Know That We Can’t Seem To Take Seriously

A recent study from the Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences reveals that increased precipitation, likely due to climate change, is correlated with a drastic reduction in primary productivity levels in the Gulf of Maine. Phytoplankton, the organisms responsible for fixing carbon from the atmosphere and the oceans, are at the very base of the marine food web. … More Info »

An Inconvenient Truth About Gulf of Maine Cod

Many in New England were recently stunned by the news that the region’s prized codfish are in much deeper trouble than anyone had realized. The bleak conclusion of the most recent scientific assessment was unexpected, because just three years earlier cod appeared to show signs of recovery. Fishermen, scientists, and others have rightfully been asking, “What happened?” … More Info »

New research on the Atlantic wolffish, a depleted species that needs our help

In the deep ocean waters off New England’s coast lives one of our region’s most unique fish species: the Atlantic wolffish. While these fish may look threatening, and indeed they use their canine-like teeth (hence the name “wolffish”) to crush … More Info »