Posted in Protecting Ocean Ecosystems

Marine Reserves are Climate Reserves

Scientists have been researching ways to slow climate change or at least mitigate its impacts. One new study shows that marine reserves allow ecosystems to adapt and be resilient to the major predicted impacts of climate change: acidification, sea-level rise, the intensification of storms, shifts in species distribution, and decreased productivity and oxygen availability.  … More Info »

The Harmful Underwater Search for Oil and Gas

A new study published in Nature describes how seismic testing has greater and more widespread ecosystem impacts than previously known. Past research has focused on the detrimental impacts for marine mammals and commercially important fish, but the Nature study revealed that seismic testing has the potential to decimate phytoplankton populations – the foundation of the marine food chain. … More Info »

Longfin Squid Catch a Break

Several years ago, the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council began thinking about making amendments to the longfin squid fishery. Longfin squid are an important forage species especially off the coasts of New England. They are a source of food for commercial, recreational, and other familiar species such as sea bass, flounder, and bluefish. Having a healthy population of forage species is crucial to maintaining food webs and a productive ecosystem. So when fishermen and scientists began reporting changes in the fishery, the Council took notice. … More Info »

On World Oceans Day, Help Defend New England’s National Monuments!

This year’s World Oceans Day is more important than ever as some of our most treasured ocean areas (as well as land areas) are under attack. President Trump has ordered a review of 27 national monuments around the United States – including the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument – and has expressed a desire to reverse the hard-earned protections for these monuments. The Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument is another New England treasure that is also under threat. … More Info »

Why wouldn’t we support the New England Marine Monument?

Whatever your political leanings, one has to acknowledge that the Obama Administration did something extraordinary last fall. Through the Antiquities Act, it protected almost five thousand miles of an incredibly biodiverse piece of ocean off of New England from large-scale extraction, while preserving recreational fishing access. This was the first such action to protect large-scale ecosystems on the East Coast, and it was generally supported by the recreational fishing community. … More Info »

World Wildlife Day: Lowest North Atlantic right whale calving season in 15 years intensifies need for solutions

North Atlantic right whales have made headlines lately, and not just because they’re spending time off the coast of Cape Cod. Sadly, reports about the endangered whales have focused on the news that birth rates are now below the mortality rate – indicating population decline. Just three calves were born this winter, the lowest rate in at least 15 years. … More Info »

Op-ed: Preserve Cashes Ledge and save fish

This post is an op-ed that was featured in the Climate Change Column of the Ipswich Chronicle. The author is Charlotte Kahn, an Ipswich resident and retired researcher/writer. … More Info »

A Bright Day for Deep-Sea Corals

For a deep-sea coral that can survive for centuries, not every day is remarkable. But last week was special for those corals that live in the deep waters off the U.S. mid-Atlantic states. The colorful, fragile marine animals are now part of the Frank R. Lautenberg Deep-Sea Coral Protection Area, under a rule drafted by the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council and issued by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). … More Info »

Ancient Deep Sea Corals Need Protection From Modern Threats

Deep-sea coral researcher, Sandra Brooke, has traveled far and wide—including four trips in Alvin plus journeys in other submersible vehicles—to study these fragile organisms, which grow in a variety of formations and can live for thousands of years. … More Info »

Optimum Yield for the Environment and All of Us

There is no shortage of historic firsts for the Atlantic Ocean. From the European discoveries of New England’s vast cod abundance that launched colonial America’s first industry to Marconi’s first trans-Atlantic wireless transmission to Lindberg’s harrowing trans-Atlantic flight, the Atlantic … More Info »