Posted in Opinion

10 Reasons the Mid-Atlantic Council Should Manage River Herring and Shad in Federal Ocean Waters

Here are 10 reasons the council should vote to extend federal management to river herring and shad. … More Info »

Will River Herring and Shad Get Another Chance?

This week, the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council will vote on whether or not to add river herring and shad as a stock in the Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan. Doing so would provide river herring and shad the protections and rebuilding requirements required by federal law. Captain John McMurray offers his reasons why they should. … More Info »

Congressman Boehlert: New England’s ocean treasures deserve protection

This post is an excerpt from an opinion piece in The Patriot Ledger, in which former Rep. Sherwood Boehlert (Republican, former Chair of the House Science Committee) expresses his support of marine national monument designation for the New England Coral Canyons and Seamounts. … More Info »

Is GMO Necessarily Bad?

This is a guest post by Rip Cunningham, Recreational Fisheries Consultant. The views expressed in the post are the writer’s own. Genetically modified salmon is the first of its kind and has recently been the focus of much debate. For other points of view, read a post in Vox Populi by a Dartmouth Professor of Environmental Studies and a chief scientist at the Ocean Conservancy. More of the debate can also be read on the New York Times’ Opinion Page. … More Info »

“Holy Mackerel!” – Capt. McMurray Sounds Alarms About Unmanaged Forage Fish

In his follow-up blog to the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council meeting, Captain John McMurray summarizes the general comments submitted during the scoping process and sounds alarms that emphasize the critical need for an Unmanaged Forage Omnibus Amendment. … More Info »

Of Sandeels and Tuna: We Need Your Help Getting Ahead of the Curve – John McMurray

The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council has started a scoping process for how to “initiate a regulatory action to prohibit the development of new, or expansion of existing, directed fisheries for unmanaged forage species until adequate scientific information is available to promote ecosystem sustainability.” The Council is looking for comments on eight specific questions, which John McMurray lists in his blog and offers his own opinions. … More Info »

Fishing’s Future and the Trans-Pacific Partnership

Yesterday the Senate voted to end debate on President Obama’s fast-track authority to negotiate the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). While the full text of the TPP has not been publicly released, it will be important for the U.S. government to ensure that the fisheries-focused piece of the agreement provides for stewardship of our ocean resources. … More Info »

Incorporating Community into Regional Ocean Planning

It is well documented that the waters off of New England are changing. Between shifts in the ecosystem and changing use patterns, the future of coastal communities is uncertain. What is certain is that the future of our coastal communities is intertwined with decisions about how we use and manage these waters. A well-executed ocean plan will help these communities protect their future, improve ocean management, and result in healthier ecosystems. The Regional Planning Body will take significant steps towards addressing the underlying concerns raised by fishermen and fishing communities around New England. … More Info »

What’s Happened to All the Striped Bass?

For the past six years I’ve fished for striped bass a few days each fall off Montauk, Long Island, with charter boat Capt. John McMurray, a fellow Coast Guard veteran who is a member of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, which sets fishing policies in federal waters from New York to North Carolina. In the past, McMurray and I caught so many big bass on light tackle—a lightweight rod, reel, and line—that we lost count and returned to the dock exhausted. But in the last couple of years, unfortunately, it’s gotten harder to spot the fish. And on our most recent trip, we could hardly find any. I caught only one. … More Info »

With Menhaden Making a Comeback, Managers are at a Crossroads

It appears that we may soon get some promising news about the fish that’s sometimes called the most important one in the sea—the Atlantic menhaden. These small forage fish constitute a key part of the marine food web, and now the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is nearing completion of a new assessment of the stock. … More Info »