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A Big Picture Approach to Managing Little Herring

NEFMC is considering an amendment to the Atlantic herring fishery management plan that would require that catch limits take into account the role herring play in the ocean food web. … More Info »

Recognizing the Threats to River Herring

While there’s been progress to improve habitat in rivers, the threat in the oceans remains. That’s why our friends at Earthjustice, the Natural Resources Defense Council, and a coalition of grass-roots fishing and watershed groups filed a complaint in U.S. District Court on Feb. 10, seeking to reverse a federal government decision not to put blueback herring on the nation’s list of threatened species. … More Info »

With Menhaden Making a Comeback, Managers are at a Crossroads

It appears that we may soon get some promising news about the fish that’s sometimes called the most important one in the sea—the Atlantic menhaden. These small forage fish constitute a key part of the marine food web, and now the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is nearing completion of a new assessment of the stock. … More Info »

An ‘Ounce of Prevention’ for Little Fish

Thanks to Benjamin Franklin, we know the value of an “ounce of prevention.” Now, fisheries officials for the mid-Atlantic region are applying that well-founded wisdom to the management of forage fish—those small, schooling, prey species that feed so many other animals in the sea. … More Info »

The New York Times Sounds Alarm on Ocean Warming—Will Fisheries Officials Listen?

A recent headline in The New York Times sums up what many New England coastal communities have been wrestling with for the past few years: “Waters Warm, and Cod Catch Ebbs in Maine.” The piece concludes that the implications of this warming “should prompt the fishermen and regulators alike to plan for change before it arrives.” This is exactly what scientists have been telling New England’s fisheries managers to do in regard to an important decision that is pending. … More Info »

Scientists Speak Up For New England’s Ocean Habitat

In a letter to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, prominent researchers such as Sylvia Earle and Carl Safina urged fisheries officials to protect the places that fish need to find food and shelter, grow, and reproduce. … More Info »

Emergency Action Needed to Reverse Cod’s Collapse

Federal fisheries officials have a chance to halt the alarming decline of New England’s cod. But they can only do so if they take swift, bold action not only to reduce the number of cod killed by fishing but to increase protection for the places these fish need to feed, grow, and reproduce. Taking such actions will require farsighted leadership, in order to overturn the stubborn pattern of risky management decisions that have driven the region’s most traditionally important fish to historic lows. … More Info »

Exploring America’s Ocean Canyons

Officials in the mid-Atlantic region are considering important and much-needed protection for some 39,000 square miles of U.S. territory, an area larger than Delaware, Maryland, and New Jersey combined. But it’s not a place that you or I have ever visited. It’s part of the country’s ocean realm stretching 200 miles from shore, beyond our shallow coastal waters. Fortunately, the deep-sea explorations of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration vessel Okeanos Explorer and its unmanned submersible are bringing parts of that vast, largely unknown area into spectacular, close-up view. … More Info »

Risky Decisions and the Demise of New England’s Cod

People across the Northeast are rightly asking what is wrong with the management of New England’s fishing, and what needs to change.The Pew Charitable Trusts aimed to answer those questions with thorough research on and analysis of actions by the New England Fishery Management Council. The result is an issue brief we have titled “Risky Decisions.” … More Info »

Manhattan’s Marine Mammals Make a Meal of Menhaden

New York might not be the first place you’d think of for a nature experience, but wildlife lovers there are thrilling to the sight of whales and dolphins within view of the city’s skyline. And the resurgence of these magnificent animals is partly due to the humble fish called menhaden. … More Info »