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We Must Do More to Save Deep-Sea Corals

Less than 100 miles offshore from the heavily populated Eastern Seaboard lie submerged seascapes that look more like visions from another world than the cities and landmarks for which they are named. Most amazing, perhaps, are the living structures known as deep-sea corals that many of these animals depend upon for habitat. The Magnuson-Stevens Act is due for renewal—and the deep-sea corals illustrate why we need to update this important law. … More Info »

This Whale of a Photo Says a lot about Keeping Oceans Healthy

The return of that whale, nicknamed “Rockaway Jerry,” and dozens of other whales to New York’s waters is partly due to smarter management of our ocean resources. It’s a success story that we would like to see a lot more of, as we seek to modernize the nation’s principal ocean fishery management law to take the needs of whales like Rockaway Jerry into account. … More Info »

Southern New England’s Worst Year in History for River Herring Raises Concerns at Sea

Fisheries officials and watershed conservation groups have tallied the spring migratory runs of river herring, and in parts of southern New England, 2015 likely will go down as a particularly terrible year for these critically important forage fish. Reports from across Connecticut and Rhode Island show the number of migrating fish declining dramatically compared with recent years, leading one prominent biologist to call this year “the worst in history” in his state. … More Info »

America’s ‘Founding Fish’ Need a Helping Hand

For centuries, Americans have drawn inspiration and sustenance from the river herring and shad that surge each spring from the Atlantic Ocean into coastal rivers and streams to spawn. … More Info »

Fishing Blind

A recent move by New England ocean fisheries management officials to suspend monitoring of commercial fishing vessels is the latest sign of disarray in a program meant to provide reliable, independent information about fishing. … More Info »

NOAA Must Act to Save New England’s Fish Habitat

The New England Fishery Management Council dealt a serious blow June 16 to the region’s ocean health with a vote to sharply reduce the amount of seafloor set aside to protect marine habitat for fish. … More Info »

Deep-Sea Corals Win Historic Protection

Federal fisheries officials in the Mid-Atlantic voted on June 10 to create the largest protected area in U.S. Atlantic waters, a roughly 38,000 square-mile region where scientists have found an abundance of deep-sea corals. … More Info »

Decision Time for Deep Corals in the Mid-Atlantic

On June 10, regional fisheries officials will have the chance to create the largest protected area in U.S. Atlantic waters when they vote on a proposal to help preserve deep-sea corals and the unique habitat these animals create. … More Info »

Making the Most of the Most Important Fish – It’s time to modernize management of Atlantic menhaden

Fisheries managers for the Atlantic Coast states face an important decision May 5 about what’s sometimes called the most important fish in the sea: Atlantic menhaden. Officials could increase the allowable catch to appease the East Coast’s largest fishing industry. Or they could begin to manage this forage species in a way that protects fish, seabirds, and whales, as well as the interests of the people who care about and depend on those animals from Florida to Maine. … More Info »

NOAA Warns New England Fishery Council Not to Weaken Ocean Habitat Protection

You might think that habitat protection would be an obvious priority in New England, which has the country’s worst record on overfishing and depleted fish stocks. Unfortunately, this long-overdue plan to manage the region’s ocean habitat could end up slashing protected areas by roughly 70 percent. … More Info »