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The Bottom Line: Don’t Remove Protection When Cod Need It Most

New England is famous for cod fishing. But the industry is ailing – and the cure being proposed might be worse than the disease. A proposal by regional fisheries managers to reopen areas where groundfish are currently protected is a big step in the wrong direction. … More Info »

The Bottom Line: Big Turnout for Little Menhaden

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission has seen a lot in its 70-year history but nothing quite like this. More than 128,000 people flooded the commission’s inboxes with postcards and emails last month, a new record for public comment. Scientists, small business owners, nature lovers, and anglers sent letters and spoke out at public hearings. And it was all about a fish that almost no one ever eats—Atlantic menhaden. … More Info »

The Bottom Line: Historic Moment for Menhaden

By Lee Crockett of the Pew Environment Group. Menhaden numbers have plunged nearly 90 percent over the past 25 years, and the regulators responsible for their management will soon make a critical decision. In December, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) could finally help the depleted population recover by setting a coastwide, science- based annual catch limit. … More Info »

New Study Shows Overfishing Costs Southeast and Gulf Regions Millions Per Year

Black Sea Bass

By Lee Crockett of the Pew Environment Group. There’s an old saying that a penny saved is a penny earned. This sound financial advice is equally true for management of U.S. ocean fish resources. As I’ve said before, conserving our ocean fish populations is a prudent economic investment. The converse is also true: Overfishing is bad economic policy. … More Info »

A Small ‘Catch’ in Recent Fisheries Coverage

(By Lee Crockett of the Pew Environment Group) I want to follow up to make an important distinction between catch limits and catch shares, a difference that has been inadequately explained by NOAA and has resulted in some understandable confusion. The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act requires properly set and enforced catch limits that prevent overfishing and ensure the rebuilding of depleted fish populations. … More Info »

Fishing for Giants

By Lee Crockett of the Pew Environment Group. The rod-and-reel fishermen who catch bluefin tuna deserve to have their stories told. “Wicked Tuna” has the opportunity to introduce TV audiences to this magnificent fish, the men and women who pursue them, and the types of fishing gear they use. National Geographic is working hard to present a balanced view, highlighting both the fishermen and conservation concerns. … More Info »

Little Fish, Big Fishery

Within the next few weeks, alewife and blueback herring, collectively known as river herring, will begin their annual migration from coastal waters to their native rivers. … More Info »

How Investing in Our Fisheries Pays Off

By Lee Crockett of the Pew Environment Group. Sometimes, an idea comes forward in Washington that actually brings together people who normally disagree. The Fisheries Investment and Regulatory Relief Act (FIRRA) of 2012 does that and more. This bipartisan bill would provide financial support to fishermen and improve management of our oceans. … More Info »

Bottom Line: Historic Anniversary for Fishing in America’s Oceans

It’s hard to get politicians to agree on anything these days. But five years ago this month, President George W. Bush, flanked by Republican and Democratic members of Congress, signed the reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA). This moment of bipartisanship was good news for our nation’s marine species and those who rely on them for a living. … More Info »

Bottom Line: New Year’s Resolution 2012: Let’s Gain Weight in the Ocean

One of the most popular New Year’s resolutions for Americans is to lose weight. Around this time of year, gyms fill up, the health food sections of supermarkets become crowded, and people whose daily exercise consisted of picking up their mail start jogging. But for the fish in America’s oceans, we need to resolve to help them gain weight. Bigger, older animals will create abundant offspring, which will lead to better fishing, increased seafood, more jobs, and healthier and more resilient ocean ecosystems. (Lee Crockett leads the Pew Environment Group’s efforts in Washington, D.C. to establish policies to end overfishing and promote sustainable fisheries management.) … More Info »