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Ancient Deep Sea Corals Need Protection From Modern Threats

Deep-sea coral researcher, Sandra Brooke, has traveled far and wide—including four trips in Alvin plus journeys in other submersible vehicles—to study these fragile organisms, which grow in a variety of formations and can live for thousands of years. … More Info »

With New Fish Rule, NOAA Lets the Big One Get Away

In October the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which oversees our nation’s fisheries, passed up a chance to take a major step toward EBFM. … More Info »

Marine Scientist Follows Hot Fish as They Move to Cooler Waters

Warming oceans have fish on the move, and one man is in hot pursuit. That man, Rutgers University marine biologist Malin Pinsky, has tracked fish species all over North American waters to learn where they’re headed in search of cooler conditions. … More Info »

Heavy Lift: New England UPS Driver Rescued Tons of Fish, One Net at a Time

UPS driver Bill McWha had just moved to Wakefield, Rhode Island, in 2010 when he decided to check out his town’s main river. From the banks of the Saugatucket, McWha was horrified by what he saw: thousands of migrating river herring stuck at a dam, unable to swim over to reach their spawning sites. So he took matters into his own hands. … More Info »

A Coffin for Cod? The Downward Spiral of the Fish that Built New England

As fish populations have plummeted, fishery managers have shown a consistent pattern of failing to heed warnings from scientists, sufficiently limit catch, promptly pursue corrective actions, and otherwise do what’s needed to help fish populations recover, including protecting the habitat and bait fish that cod rely upon. It’s high time to finally get it right. … More Info »

Why is Managing Fish in the World’s Oceans Like an Episode of ‘I Love Lucy’?

Fish scientist Jason Link says he often feels like he’s living the classic chocolate factory episode of the 1950s TV show “I Love Lucy,” in which Lucy and Ethel can’t wrap candies as fast as the conveyor belt spits them out. “We’re trying to keep up with rules on individual species whose populations are frequently changing. Our conveyor belt is moving faster and faster.” … More Info »

Going to the Mat for Fish and Fishermen

For more than four decades, the California-based fishing advocate has worked to find common ground between taking care of the environment and looking out for the needs of family fishermen. Armed with passion and determination, the law school graduate and former U.S. Marine Corps sergeant is a recognized leader in the shaping of fishing and environmental rules that affect millions of people nationwide. … More Info »

A Good Move for Menhaden

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission decided to take a big picture approach to managing this prey species so that its vital role in the ocean food web is protected. This marks a major shift from the old way of setting catch limits—focusing on a single species—and gives the commission a better way to consider the health of the broader ocean ecosystem. … More Info »

Tracking Fish Oil Supplements to the Source

Are fish oil supplements really improving our health but hurting our oceans? That’s one question New York Times bestselling author Paul Greenberg is exploring for his next book, due out next year, The Omega Principle: The Health of Our Hearts, the Strength of Our Minds, and the Survival of our Oceans All in One Little Pill. … More Info »

Fisherman Finds a Way to Help Sea Animals Avoid Needless Death on Hooks

Palmer’s creation shows how ingenuity can help solve a pressing problem for marine life. Each year, some kinds of traditional fishing gear incidentally kill large numbers of marine animals, a problem known as bycatch. But in certain cases, changing the types of lines, nets, hooks, or other options can reduce the problem. Palmer and I agree that under the right circumstances, alternative gear such as his can make sense both for the environment and some fishermen. … More Info »