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Council Should Request Emergency Action for Cod

Atlantic cod has been managed in New England waters as two stocks—Gulf of Maine cod and Georges Bank cod—since the early 1970s. On Thursday, the New England Fishery Management Council will receive a presentation on a report that shows this approach does not reflect the true stock structure of Atlantic cod. Conservation Law Foundation has asked the Council to take immediate action in response. … More Info »

Tell Fishery Managers: New England’s Groundfish Fishery Needs 100% Monitoring

The primary mandate of our federal fisheries law, the Magnuson-Stevens Act, is to prevent overfishing. To do so, managers must understand how much and where fish are caught. The at-sea monitoring program was established in New England’s groundfish fishery to accomplish this very task, but it is abundantly clear that the program fails to get the job done. The New England Fishery Management Council is developing Amendment 23 to the Northeast Multispecies Fishery Management Plan in an effort to improve the at-sea monitoring program, and now is the time to let the Council know that New England’s groundfish fishery needs 100% at-sea monitoring. … More Info »

Feds Offer More Excuses for Reckless Management of Cod

Last week, the National Marine Fisheries Service announced annual catch limits (ACLs) for New England’s groundfish stocks in fishing year 2019. Alarmingly, the new ACL for Georges Bank cod represents a 15 percent increase from the 2018 catch limit, and the agency’s justifications for doing so are sketchy to say the least. … More Info »

Mass DMF Suspends Important Groundfish Closure

If there’s a fish that defines Massachusetts, it’s Atlantic cod. After all, there is a wooden carving of one hanging in the State House. But unfortunately, our favorite fish has seen better days. Centuries of intense fishing have forced regional cod stocks to historic lows, and that’s why it was concerning when the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries decided to suspend an area closure that would have provided important protection for Atlantic cod in local waters. … More Info »

New England Fishery Council Considers a Clam Dredge Exemption

Whether on a warm summer evening or a frigid winter night, a good bowl of New England clam chowder always hits the spot. Unfortunately, the large scale clamming that goes into producing a bowl of clam chowder is one of the most destructive forms of fishing there is. And now, the clam industry in New England seems to be getting special treatment despite its impact on ocean habitat. … More Info »

H.R. 200 Hurts Fish and Fishermen

Yesterday, in a troubling vote, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 200, jeopardizing the future of sustainable fisheries and insulting the years of bipartisan, science-based efforts that have defined fisheries management in the United States. … More Info »

Atlantic cod is still a world of unknown, so why raise the catch limit?

New England’s groundfish fishery is a particularly tricky one to manage, and I don’t envy those who are faced with the task. But when it comes to Atlantic cod—still persistently overfished and subject to overfishing in the Gulf of Maine after 28 years of management – you just have to ask, what are they thinking? … More Info »

Fishery Council’s Coral Protections Are Progress, Though More Could Have Been Done

Last week, the New England Fishery Management Council approved the Omnibus Deep-Sea Coral Amendment. Overall, this amendment is a win for New England’s ocean, protecting more than 25,000 square miles of fragile seafloor habitat. But we can’t help but examine the process behind this management decision. … More Info »

Ocean Acidification Threatens Our Shellfish

The Massachusetts legislature is current considering a number of bills regarding ocean acidification. If passed into law, the bills will establish a special commission or task force to study the effects of coastal and ocean acidification on coastal communities, fishing and aquaculture industries, and local commercially-harvested species. These bills come at a very critical time when what we do or don’t do next to address the effects of ocean acidification could very well alter the Commonwealth’s culture and economy. … More Info »

Trump’s National Ocean Proclamation Covfefe, Confusing

Following the tradition of those who have come before him, President Trump proclaimed June National Oceans Month. However, as has been his modus operandi, Trump broke ranks with his predecessors. Instead of using National Ocean Month as a platform for promoting conservation, Trump seized the moment to suggest ways to exploit and destroy our oceans treasures. Marine life had better take cover, because National Ocean Month under President Trump means oil drilling destruction and favoring commercial interests over environmental protections. … More Info »