Posted June 2016

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, June 10

In this edition of Fish talk in the News, regulators revisit the chance of reopening Maine’s shrimp fishery; GMRI launches Voices of the Gulf of Maine video series; fish can recognize human faces; shad and river herring are pouring into the Penobscot; South shore lobster fishermen seek exemption from a closure; the UN agreement to stop IUU fishing will go take effect; Governor LePage criticizes the proposed EU lobster ban; and the U.S. Attorney’s office indicts a Gloucester seafood executive for tax fraud. … More Info »

How Science and a Bit of Luck Brought Atlantic Sea Scallops Back from the Brink

In 1995, one year after three areas of the seafloor off Cape Cod were closed to fishing, researchers piloting remotely operated vehicles saw something unexpected: The muddy bottom was littered with market-sized scallops, rusty red and round as saucers. This surprise discovery was one link in a chain of events that brought these shellfish back from commercial collapse. This blog is a cross-post from Oceana. … More Info »

Fisheries and Fishermen: Part of the Ocean Plan Puzzle

On this World Oceans Day, let’s take a step back from the day-to-day workings of fisheries management to view New England’s ocean on a larger scale. Our region’s fish species, and the fishermen that rely on them, are part of a very busy, ever-changing environment, and although fishery managers only have authority over fishery resources, this idea is an important one to remember. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, June 7

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, South Shore groundfishermen are skeptical of electronic monitoring; Maine and Canadian scientists say American lobster is not invading European waters; NOAA announces $11 million in funding for U.S. fisheries projects; NOAA looks to expand domestic aquaculture production; NOAA announces 2016-17 Monkfish RSA awards; Senator King sees climate change impacts on shellfish as a major threat; NEFMC’s Groundfish Committee meets Thursday; and is kelp the new kale? … More Info »

Fishing Groups Exaggerate Economic Impacts of a New England Marine National Monument

The New England Coral Canyons and Seamounts Area holds remarkable ecologic value—ancient deep sea coral gardens, abundant and diverse marine mammal populations, as well as sea turtles and sea birds, and an array of rare and unusual marine species. The area is also distinguished by how little fishing actually occurs there. It is truly one of the least fished areas on the U.S. Atlantic Seaboard. That’s why I have to call out erroneous claims that creating a marine national monument in New England’s Coral Canyons and Seamounts would have “devastating economic impacts” on any fishery or port in New England. The facts simply contradict those claims. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, June 3

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, NOAA Fisheries releases its annual economics report; groundfishermen start to use electronic monitoring; the chairman of the House Committee on Natural Resources visits New Bedford; police find hundreds of illegal sea bass; NOAA recovers scallop survey camera; Sara Rademaker grows elvers into eels; and Maine’s elver harvest tops $13 million as the season winds down. … More Info »