Tagged forage fish

Video: River Herring Runs

Last week’s unusually warm weather in New England have us looking forward to the spring and warmer months. And with the spring, come river herring runs. The runs are still a couple months away, but it’s never too early to start thinking about the importance of river habitat to migrating fish trying to reach their spawning grounds. If these fish aren’t caught as bycatch at sea, many of them still face a tough swim upriver.Check out these videos (courtesy of The Fish Wrap Writer) from last year’s runs on the Saugatucket River in Rhode Island. … More Info »

Why for the love of river herring I went to frigid Plymouth for a sea herring meeting

On Tuesday, February 7, when wind driven snow slashed across the bay, in Plymouth the fate of a small silver fish and a fishery was being decided at a meeting of the New England Fishery Management Council’s Herring Committee. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, February 3

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, value of Maine lobster exports to China on pace to triple for 2016; quota for elver could change in 2018; witch flounder catch limit doubles; Maine state representatives propose new lobster bills; Maine man tackles commercial fishing without a net; lobstermen question need for restrictions to help species; fishery managers seek to avoid another herring shortage; and New England’s effort to research declining shrimp is underway. … More Info »

Memo to Council on Atlantic Herring: Don’t Stop Now

Around the country, fishery managers have begun a transition to ecosystem-based fisheries management, which considers how fishing for individual species affects the wider ecosystem, and how such factors as ocean conditions, and the presence or absence of predators, affect the number of fish that can be caught sustainably. The New England Fishery Management Council is using this modern, realistic approach as it reconsiders how it sets catch limits for Atlantic herring. … More Info »

A Review of 2016 on Talking Fish

Many of us, Talking Fish included, are ready to leave 2016 behind and wish for the best in the New Year. But it’s still valuable to reflect on the past year and review some of the major topics that we covered around New England’s fisheries. Merriam Webster chose “surreal” as the 2016 word of the year; it seems a similar sentiment can be applied to the world of New England fisheries in 2016, as we encountered many ups and downs throughout the year. … More Info »

Is the Acadian Redfish Helping Puffins Adapt to Climate Change?

As Atlantic herring follow cooler waters north, rebounding redfish populations have become a vital source of food for some puffin colonies … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, December 9

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, the Obama Administration approves the first ocean management plans; ASMFC seeks public input on its menhaden management plan; fishing interests sue over New York wind farm auction; quahog clams offer 1,000-year history of ocean change; and a leaked WWF report levels harsh criticism of MSC. … More Info »

Local News Outlets Highlight Cape Fishermen’s Frustration with Herring Midwater Trawlers

The New England Fishery Management Council will resume its discussion on localized depletion of Atlantic herring at its meeting tomorrow. If you’re new to the issue of localized depletion, or need a refresher before tomorrow’s discussion (11/17), local Cape Cod news outlets, as well as past Talking Fish posts, have highlighted the concerns of local fishermen leading up to this week’s Council meeting. … More Info »

10 Reasons the Mid-Atlantic Council Should Manage River Herring and Shad in Federal Ocean Waters

Here are 10 reasons the council should vote to extend federal management to river herring and shad. … More Info »

Will River Herring and Shad Get Another Chance?

This week, the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council will vote on whether or not to add river herring and shad as a stock in the Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan. Doing so would provide river herring and shad the protections and rebuilding requirements required by federal law. Captain John McMurray offers his reasons why they should. … More Info »