Tagged ecosystem-based fisheries management

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, March 27

Acadian redfish is one species of "trash fish" that New England chefs are increasingly offering on their menus. Image via NOAA FishWatch.

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, AP investigates slave labor in illegal fishing; a recent article summarizes the MSA Reauthorization Bill; recreational fishermen explore EBFM; Mass and Maine Senators introduce amendment to support monitoring of New England fisheries; U.S. Senators support ocean acidification monitoring systems; Maine legislator wants to cap state scallop harvest; NEFMC holds a public hearing on herring amendment; researchers test probiotics to fight shellfish disease; restaurants embrace local “trash fish”; NOAA issues new sea turtle observer requirements; NOAA offers congrats to Maine Fishermen’s Forum; a Pew report shows cod overfished in some EU waters; former NOAA Administrator wins environmental prize for catch share policy; and global warming is slowing ocean circulation.

Anglers Explore the ‘Big Picture’ on Fishing

Lee Crockett fishing

Nearly a hundred sports fishermen from southern New England joined scientists and state and federal officials Tuesday for a deep dive into what’s known as ecosystem-based fisheries management, or EBFM, during the Southern New England Recreational Fishing Symposium. The event was billed as building a path to “an abundant future of recreational fishing,” and how EBFM can help make that happen.

Pacific Council Leads on Protecting Prey—Now Atlantic Coast Managers Should Raise the Bar

School of silversides. Image via NOAA.

Fisheries managers on the Pacific Coast made a big move this week to protect the little fish at the base of the ocean food web. New England, alas, lags behind.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, February 27

Atlantic cod. (Photo credit: Joachim Muller)

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NOAA and Gloucester fishermen reached an agreement on the cod bargain deal; NEFMC submitted Framework Adjustment 53 to NOAA Fisheries; the nation’s fisheries scientists convened to discuss climate and ecosystem-based issues; it was another year of historic landings and value for Maine lobster; ocean acidification threatens coastal fisheries and communities; Sustaining Massachusetts Fisheries Summit will take place on March 2; Maine will begin closing scallop areas; and NOAA Fisheries will review sea scallop survey methods.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, January 30

Sea scallop with 100 eyes at Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Photo Credit: Dann Blackwood, USGS

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NMFS announced it will not modify Gulf of Maine cod restrictions; NEFMC rejected river herring protections; one editorial says Maine’s lobster industry provides a good example for ecosystem-based management; Maine’s scallop season will likely be cut short; Maine scallop divers feel restrictions are unfair; Maine elver exporters may need to get a license; a Cape Cod shellfisherman received his license to build an oyster farm; shrimp prices are up; Portland’s Mayor wants to serve more locally caught fish; the 2015 menhaden stock assessment highlights the need for ecosystem-based management; increasing fish consumption drives fears of depleted stocks; climate change is affecting fish distribution; and NMFS released its draft Climate Science Strategy.

With Menhaden Making a Comeback, Managers are at a Crossroads

A striped bass chasing menhaden. Image credit: Pew Charitable Trusts

It appears that we may soon get some promising news about the fish that’s sometimes called the most important one in the sea—the Atlantic menhaden. These small forage fish constitute a key part of the marine food web, and now the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is nearing completion of a new assessment of the stock.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, December 19

Higher ocean temperatures are causing lobsters to shed their shells and migrate inshore earlier in the season than usual. Photo Credit: Zachary Whalen/Flickr.

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, GMRI developed an interactive map for viewing OHA alternatives; a new online tool tracks migrating fish populations; Maine’s 2014 lobster season has a low catch; scientists will being forecasting lobster migrations in the Gulf of Maine; MAFMC will set new standards for forage fish fisheries; NMFS is seeking comment on a new bycatch reporting methodology; the Gulf of Maine is warming faster than any other ocean waters on earth; Legal Sea Foods CEO and president says climate change is the real problem facing New England fisheries; New Hampshire schools are serving locally landed fish in their cafeterias; ASMFC approved a new management plan for summer flounder; a presidential task force issued recommendations for handling illegal fishing and seafood fraud; US District Court ruled in favor of NMFS and the scallop industry in a long-term court challenge with Oceana; MSA reauthorization bill was introduced in Senate; NOAA Fisheries is conducting surveys on river herring; NOAA Fisheries is hosting public webinars for Amendment 7; and NOAA Fisheries is seeking public input on deterring marine mammals.

An ‘Ounce of Prevention’ for Little Fish

An adult sand lance. Image credit: NOAA.

Thanks to Benjamin Franklin, we know the value of an “ounce of prevention.” Now, fisheries officials for the mid-Atlantic region are applying that well-founded wisdom to the management of forage fish—those small, schooling, prey species that feed so many other animals in the sea.

Giving Thanks for a Life-Changing Adventure–and More

Damage Controlman 3rd Class Lee Crocket at the Coast Guard Station in Neah Bay, Washington, in 1977. His mission was primarily search-and-rescue, mainly of stranded fishermen. Photo courtesy of Lee Crockett.

In this Thanksgiving season, I’m giving a public thanks to the U.S. Coast Guard for the adventure that began my journey as an ocean steward…I’m also grateful for the good things that have happened in U.S. ocean conservation in 2014.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, November 21

Atlantic cod. Photo credit: Joachim Muller.

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NEFMC cut the cod quota for the 2015 fishing year; Gulf of Maine lobstermen are exempt from cod closures; EDF is calling for 100% monitoring of groundfish boats; local cod prices are expected to rise; Charlie Baker voices support for local fishermen; Gloucester looks to balance fishing with tourism; NOAA Fisheries released Multispecies Framework 52 for public comment; NOAA Fisheries proposed 2015 fishing year specifications; NEFMC expanded scallop closures; ICCAT increased the bluefin tuna quota; Maine seafood suppliers are low on shrimp for the winter season; Maine fishermen are banking on the Portland Fish Exchange renovation; a PhD student is studying river herring migration; Great Bay oyster restoration is proving successful; a Maine-based company is developing yellowtail aquaculture; scientists discussed US-based eel aquaculture; and a new library exhibit in Providence features artwork from 19th century whaling ships.