Tagged ecosystem-based fisheries management

Let’s Keep the ‘Status of the Stocks’ Strong

Atlantic cod. Photo credit: Joachim Muller.

The just-released report indicates that we continue to make important headway in ending overfishing and reducing the number of overfished stocks. In addition, the agency finds that 37 once-depleted fish populations have been rebuilt to healthy levels since 2000. However, the report also highlights issues that still need to be addressed.

McMurray on Menhaden: Don’t Kill the Comeback

A striped bass caught while munching on menhaden. Will fishery managers make sure there are enough of these fish in the water to feed ocean animals? Photo by Capt. John McMurray.

Charter boat captain and Mid-Atlantic fishery management council member John McMurray has an important message about menhaden in his latest post at the site Reel Time.

A Big Picture Approach to Managing Little Herring

A herring trawler. Photo credit: Greg Wells.

NEFMC is considering an amendment to the Atlantic herring fishery management plan that would require that catch limits take into account the role herring play in the ocean food web.

Menhaden Recovery Still Incomplete in New England

Menhaden swimming through water. Photo credit: Gene Helfman.

A recent article distributed by the fishing industry web site Saving Menhaden tells a great story about the ongoing recovery of Atlantic menhaden. The article’s claims are supported by mainstream media accounts that celebrate what happens when menhaden return to local waters. Unfortunately, both the story and the recovery of what is often referred to as “The Most Important Fish in The Sea” are incomplete.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, March 27

Acadian redfish is one species of "trash fish" that New England chefs are increasingly offering on their menus. Image via NOAA FishWatch.

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, AP investigates slave labor in illegal fishing; a recent article summarizes the MSA Reauthorization Bill; recreational fishermen explore EBFM; Mass and Maine Senators introduce amendment to support monitoring of New England fisheries; U.S. Senators support ocean acidification monitoring systems; Maine legislator wants to cap state scallop harvest; NEFMC holds a public hearing on herring amendment; researchers test probiotics to fight shellfish disease; restaurants embrace local “trash fish”; NOAA issues new sea turtle observer requirements; NOAA offers congrats to Maine Fishermen’s Forum; a Pew report shows cod overfished in some EU waters; former NOAA Administrator wins environmental prize for catch share policy; and global warming is slowing ocean circulation.

Anglers Explore the ‘Big Picture’ on Fishing

Lee Crockett fishing

Nearly a hundred sports fishermen from southern New England joined scientists and state and federal officials Tuesday for a deep dive into what’s known as ecosystem-based fisheries management, or EBFM, during the Southern New England Recreational Fishing Symposium. The event was billed as building a path to “an abundant future of recreational fishing,” and how EBFM can help make that happen.

Pacific Council Leads on Protecting Prey—Now Atlantic Coast Managers Should Raise the Bar

School of silversides. Image via NOAA.

Fisheries managers on the Pacific Coast made a big move this week to protect the little fish at the base of the ocean food web. New England, alas, lags behind.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, February 27

Atlantic cod. (Photo credit: Joachim Muller)

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NOAA and Gloucester fishermen reached an agreement on the cod bargain deal; NEFMC submitted Framework Adjustment 53 to NOAA Fisheries; the nation’s fisheries scientists convened to discuss climate and ecosystem-based issues; it was another year of historic landings and value for Maine lobster; ocean acidification threatens coastal fisheries and communities; Sustaining Massachusetts Fisheries Summit will take place on March 2; Maine will begin closing scallop areas; and NOAA Fisheries will review sea scallop survey methods.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, January 30

Sea scallop with 100 eyes at Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary. Photo Credit: Dann Blackwood, USGS

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NMFS announced it will not modify Gulf of Maine cod restrictions; NEFMC rejected river herring protections; one editorial says Maine’s lobster industry provides a good example for ecosystem-based management; Maine’s scallop season will likely be cut short; Maine scallop divers feel restrictions are unfair; Maine elver exporters may need to get a license; a Cape Cod shellfisherman received his license to build an oyster farm; shrimp prices are up; Portland’s Mayor wants to serve more locally caught fish; the 2015 menhaden stock assessment highlights the need for ecosystem-based management; increasing fish consumption drives fears of depleted stocks; climate change is affecting fish distribution; and NMFS released its draft Climate Science Strategy.

With Menhaden Making a Comeback, Managers are at a Crossroads

A striped bass chasing menhaden. Image credit: Pew Charitable Trusts

It appears that we may soon get some promising news about the fish that’s sometimes called the most important one in the sea—the Atlantic menhaden. These small forage fish constitute a key part of the marine food web, and now the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is nearing completion of a new assessment of the stock.