Tagged ecosystem-based fisheries management

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, December 19

Higher ocean temperatures are causing lobsters to shed their shells and migrate inshore earlier in the season than usual. Photo Credit: Zachary Whalen/Flickr.

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, GMRI developed an interactive map for viewing OHA alternatives; a new online tool tracks migrating fish populations; Maine’s 2014 lobster season has a low catch; scientists will being forecasting lobster migrations in the Gulf of Maine; MAFMC will set new standards for forage fish fisheries; NMFS is seeking comment on a new bycatch reporting methodology; the Gulf of Maine is warming faster than any other ocean waters on earth; Legal Sea Foods CEO and president says climate change is the real problem facing New England fisheries; New Hampshire schools are serving locally landed fish in their cafeterias; ASMFC approved a new management plan for summer flounder; a presidential task force issued recommendations for handling illegal fishing and seafood fraud; US District Court ruled in favor of NMFS and the scallop industry in a long-term court challenge with Oceana; MSA reauthorization bill was introduced in Senate; NOAA Fisheries is conducting surveys on river herring; NOAA Fisheries is hosting public webinars for Amendment 7; and NOAA Fisheries is seeking public input on deterring marine mammals.

An ‘Ounce of Prevention’ for Little Fish

An adult sand lance. Image credit: NOAA.

Thanks to Benjamin Franklin, we know the value of an “ounce of prevention.” Now, fisheries officials for the mid-Atlantic region are applying that well-founded wisdom to the management of forage fish—those small, schooling, prey species that feed so many other animals in the sea.

Giving Thanks for a Life-Changing Adventure–and More

Damage Controlman 3rd Class Lee Crocket at the Coast Guard Station in Neah Bay, Washington, in 1977. His mission was primarily search-and-rescue, mainly of stranded fishermen. Photo courtesy of Lee Crockett.

In this Thanksgiving season, I’m giving a public thanks to the U.S. Coast Guard for the adventure that began my journey as an ocean steward…I’m also grateful for the good things that have happened in U.S. ocean conservation in 2014.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, November 21

Atlantic cod. Photo credit: Joachim Muller.

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NEFMC cut the cod quota for the 2015 fishing year; Gulf of Maine lobstermen are exempt from cod closures; EDF is calling for 100% monitoring of groundfish boats; local cod prices are expected to rise; Charlie Baker voices support for local fishermen; Gloucester looks to balance fishing with tourism; NOAA Fisheries released Multispecies Framework 52 for public comment; NOAA Fisheries proposed 2015 fishing year specifications; NEFMC expanded scallop closures; ICCAT increased the bluefin tuna quota; Maine seafood suppliers are low on shrimp for the winter season; Maine fishermen are banking on the Portland Fish Exchange renovation; a PhD student is studying river herring migration; Great Bay oyster restoration is proving successful; a Maine-based company is developing yellowtail aquaculture; scientists discussed US-based eel aquaculture; and a new library exhibit in Providence features artwork from 19th century whaling ships.

Warming Waters and New England Fisheries

The Gulf of Maine is warming at a faster rate than 99% of the rest of the world's oceans. Photo credit: NOAA.

Two op-ed pieces this week address the rapid warming of the Gulf of Maine’s ocean. The first outlines the emerging science of climate change effects on the ocean, and the second offers ecosystem-based fisheries management as a sensible response.

Facing the Fishing Facts

Atlantic cod. Photo credit: Dieter Craasmann.

The bad news is that the emergency measures put in place this week by NMFS’s regional director John Bullard are drastic. If the past is any prelude to the future, the worse news is that the measures will not be sufficient to stop the collapse of cod.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, November 7

The 2014 northern shrimp stock assessment indicated the lowest fishable biomass on record, a result of increased ocean temperatures in the Gulf of Maine.  Photo credit: NOAA

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NEFMC announced Omnibus Habitat Amendment 2 public hearings; Maine voters approved the Maine Marine Business Bond; Martha’s Vineyard scallop season starts strong; the Gulf of Maine shrimp season is cancelled; ASMFC’s 73rd Annual Meeting summary is now available; at-sea processing of spiny dogfish is banned; ASMFC awarded the Captain David H. Hart Award; the fishing industry and NOAA find common ground to protect whales; CT Sea Grant provided funding for coastal research projects; WHOI will use a $1 million grant to study climate change impacts on Buzzards Bay; GMRI comments on the importance of data in fisheries management; a new online tool hopes to measure the effects of the Northeast catch share program; GMRI will be hosting a presentation on fish populations and ecology in the Gulf of Maine; ISSF is calling for 100% observer coverage for bluefin tuna; and Omega Protein released its first corporate sustainability report.

Emergency Action Needed to Reverse Cod’s Collapse

Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Photo credit: Dieter Craasman.

Federal fisheries officials have a chance to halt the alarming decline of New England’s cod. But they can only do so if they take swift, bold action not only to reduce the number of cod killed by fishing but to increase protection for the places these fish need to feed, grow, and reproduce. Taking such actions will require farsighted leadership, in order to overturn the stubborn pattern of risky management decisions that have driven the region’s most traditionally important fish to historic lows.

Protecting the Prey: A Plan for the Ocean Food Web’s Foundation

Management of sandeels and other forage fish is essential for the larger fish species that depend upon them.

In a recent blog post at Reel Time, McMurray describes striped bass chasing sandeels, false albacore hunting bay anchovies, and fluke feeding on silversides. All those prey species are crucial and yet, he notes, they are not managed by fisheries officials. “Frankly, that really scares me,” McMurray says.

Editorial: As codfish dwindle, communities need to reboot

Atlantic cod at Cashes Ledge. Photo credit: Brian Skerry/New England Ocean Odyssey.

The Boston Globe ran a strong editorial on the cod crisis, yesterday, calling for new thinking and stronger conservation in the Gulf of Maine fishing industry. For a fishing community that has repeatedly relied on federal disaster relief money, it is time fishermen and fisheries managers to alter their crisis response and take the necessary action that will address the problem at the source rather than ameliorate the economic side-effects.