Tagged ecosystem-based fisheries management

NOAA Study: Climate Change Threatens Important Marine Fish and Invertebrate Species

Atlantic sea scallops are among the species that could be affected by climate change and ocean acidification.  Photo Credit: fishwatch.gov

Yesterday, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration released a major climate study that evaluated 82 Northeast marine fish and invertebrate species’ overall vulnerability to climate change as well as the potential for population distribution change. The researchers found that half of the species are “highly” or “very highly” vulnerable to the effects of climate change. This is the first multispecies assessment of its kind. … More Info »

A Bird’s Eye View on Cape Cod Fishing

Getting the big picture: Astronauts aboard the International Space Station captured this 2015 image of the northern tip of Cape Cod. Image via Earth Science and Remote Sensing Unit, NASA Johnson Space Center.

Perched aboard the International Space Station some 240 miles above the Earth, an astronaut trained a camera last July on one of the U.S. Atlantic Coast’s most instantly recognizable features: the hooked tip of Cape Cod. NASA included the picture in a list of the top 15 space station images of 2015, thanks to the striking patterns of swirling sands and what the image tells us about a landscape molded by constant change. It’s a lovely view of the place I call home, and I think it serves as a reminder of how useful it is to get a big picture on things in order to appreciate and properly respond to the changes that affect us here. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, January 5

Kemp's ridley turtles are a small, grayish-green sea turtle species found along the U.S. east coast and in the Gulf of Mexico. Image via NOAA/NMFS.

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, how can seaweed help lobsters?; Gib Brogan says ‘save haddock from the herring slaughter’; sea turtles are stranded later than ever; at-sea monitoring will go to court; and a marine ecologist strives to protect the seas. … More Info »

Clam Dredging: A Path of Destruction

The E.S.S. Pursuit in New Bedford Harbor. Image via NOAA.

The clam industry has made a number of claims about the “benign” nature of this fishery. It has done so with the hope that the fishery management council and NOAA Fisheries will allow the offshore clam fleet to continue to fish, by exemption from other regulations, in areas that the Council has identified as having some of the highest habitat benefits for New England fish species. … More Info »

A Look Back at 2015

A red cod and cunner on Cashes Ledge. Photo: Brian Skerry/NEOO

2015 seems to have gone by in the blink of an eye, and you can bet that’s because it was quite the busy year for New England fisheries and ocean issues. Now, it’s that time to look back on the last twelve months and remind ourselves of the important topics that we have highlighted on Talking Fish. … More Info »

A ‘Genius’ Fisherman’s Idea for a Cod Comeback

Fisherman-turned-researcher Ted Ames has reconstructed the history of cod in Maine. Image courtesy of the Pew Charitable Trusts.

This latest piece in the Pew Charitable Trust series on the Magnuson-Stevens Act 40th anniversary features Maine fisherman and MacArthur “Genius” Ted Ames. His work to better understand the ecological history of cod shows a potential path to a recovery for the fishery by better managing the forage fish they depended on in the past. … More Info »

Paris Climate Talks – Don’t Forget Our Oceans

A juvenile cunner swims through healthy kelp forest at Cashes Ledge. Photo credit: Brian Skerry/NEOO.

Today, the 2015 Paris Climate Talks began. When discussing climate change, it is easy to get lost in the details of atmospheric warming and on land impacts, but a huge part of our biggest global threat is the impact on our oceans and the mitigation measures that we can – and must – take to help. … More Info »

“Holy Mackerel!” – Capt. McMurray Sounds Alarms About Unmanaged Forage Fish

Chub mackerel. Image via John McMurray/Marine Fish Conservation Network.

In his follow-up blog to the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council meeting, Captain John McMurray summarizes the general comments submitted during the scoping process and sounds alarms that emphasize the critical need for an Unmanaged Forage Omnibus Amendment. … More Info »

A Coffin for Cod? The Downward Spiral of the Fish that Built New England

The 2014 cod population on Georges Bank, located off Cape Cod in the easternmost side of the Gulf of Maine, was the lowest ever recorded—roughly 1 percent of what scientists say would be a healthy population.

As fish populations have plummeted, fishery managers have shown a consistent pattern of failing to heed warnings from scientists, sufficiently limit catch, promptly pursue corrective actions, and otherwise do what’s needed to help fish populations recover, including protecting the habitat and bait fish that cod rely upon. It’s high time to finally get it right. … More Info »

This Whale of a Photo Says a lot about Keeping Oceans Healthy

The humpback whale nicknamed Rockaway Jerry enjoys a forage fish meal with a Manhattan view on the side. Photo credit: Artie Raslich.

The return of that whale, nicknamed “Rockaway Jerry,” and dozens of other whales to New York’s waters is partly due to smarter management of our ocean resources. It’s a success story that we would like to see a lot more of, as we seek to modernize the nation’s principal ocean fishery management law to take the needs of whales like Rockaway Jerry into account. … More Info »