Tagged ecosystem-based fisheries management

Memo to Council on Atlantic Herring: Don’t Stop Now

Around the country, fishery managers have begun a transition to ecosystem-based fisheries management, which considers how fishing for individual species affects the wider ecosystem, and how such factors as ocean conditions, and the presence or absence of predators, affect the number of fish that can be caught sustainably. The New England Fishery Management Council is using this modern, realistic approach as it reconsiders how it sets catch limits for Atlantic herring. … More Info »

A Review of 2016 on Talking Fish

Many of us, Talking Fish included, are ready to leave 2016 behind and wish for the best in the New Year. But it’s still valuable to reflect on the past year and review some of the major topics that we covered around New England’s fisheries. Merriam Webster chose “surreal” as the 2016 word of the year; it seems a similar sentiment can be applied to the world of New England fisheries in 2016, as we encountered many ups and downs throughout the year. … More Info »

With New Fish Rule, NOAA Lets the Big One Get Away

In October the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which oversees our nation’s fisheries, passed up a chance to take a major step toward EBFM. … More Info »

Two New Developments Could Boost Health of Fisheries and Our Ocean

Those of us who care about healthy oceans and fish populations are pleased to see two strong spotlights shine last week on ecosystem-based fishery management, or EBFM. As a reminder, the goal of EBFM is to better inform management decisions with a big-picture approach to fisheries management that uses existing data about where fish live, what they eat, what eats them, and what threats they face in order to ensure that ocean ecosystems and the fisheries they support are healthy and productive. … More Info »

Marine Scientist Follows Hot Fish as They Move to Cooler Waters

Warming oceans have fish on the move, and one man is in hot pursuit. That man, Rutgers University marine biologist Malin Pinsky, has tracked fish species all over North American waters to learn where they’re headed in search of cooler conditions. … More Info »

Local News Outlets Highlight Cape Fishermen’s Frustration with Herring Midwater Trawlers

The New England Fishery Management Council will resume its discussion on localized depletion of Atlantic herring at its meeting tomorrow. If you’re new to the issue of localized depletion, or need a refresher before tomorrow’s discussion (11/17), local Cape Cod news outlets, as well as past Talking Fish posts, have highlighted the concerns of local fishermen leading up to this week’s Council meeting. … More Info »

Are We Headed Toward the Era of Two-Headed Sharks?

The 2016 presidential election will likely go down in history books as one of the most polarizing of our time. For the last year and a half, we’ve been watching two talking heads bare their teeth at one another, taking the occasional bite, as each attempted to move the same body in two different directions. A figurative two-headed shark, you might say. But is a real two-headed shark even scarier? … More Info »

NYT Op-Ed: Not Just Another Stinky Fish

Menhaden is “not just another stinky fish” but an important forage species that predators, such as whales and ospreys, and other fish depend on. The ASMFC is voting today on menhaden catch limits for 2017 with pressure from the industry to increase quotas. The commission, however, should consider an ecosystem-based approach and maintain the current catch limits. … More Info »

10 Reasons the Mid-Atlantic Council Should Manage River Herring and Shad in Federal Ocean Waters

Here are 10 reasons the council should vote to extend federal management to river herring and shad. … More Info »

Will River Herring and Shad Get Another Chance?

This week, the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council will vote on whether or not to add river herring and shad as a stock in the Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan. Doing so would provide river herring and shad the protections and rebuilding requirements required by federal law. Captain John McMurray offers his reasons why they should. … More Info »