Tagged ecosystem-based fisheries management

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 22

School of Atlantic Cod. Photo Credit: NEFSC/NOAA

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, The White House says it will veto the House MSA Reauthorization bill; the amendment to revise national fisheries law reignites debate between industry and environmentalists; MAFMC will soon vote on the Deep Sea Coral Amendment; TNC works to restore 5,000 acres of native shellfish beds; researchers confirm reports of beluga whales; ASMFC evaluates the health of black sea bass population; NMFS announces proposed amendment to simplify Atlantic boat documentation; NOAA announces a new initiative to protect endangered species; “The President’s Salmon” tells the story of a past Atlantic salmon tradition; fishermen are on top of “Deadliest Jobs in America” list; and tickets are now on sale for the 4th Annual Boston Seafood Festival.

A Disappointing Year for River Herring in Southern New England

River herring make their way up a fish ladder. Photo credit: Greg Wells (via Pew Charitable Trusts).

Now that it’s the middle of May, we’re beginning to hear reports on the river herring runs around New England. Counters have been counting, cameras have been recording, and the annual spring migration of alewives up the streams has likely peaked, at least in Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts. It was a slow start to the season, with our unseasonably cold temperatures in March, but optimism prevailed throughout April. Now we’re hearing reports that the numbers are off, even way off, in some rivers.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 8

Derelict fishing gear is damaging to marine habitat and life. Image courtesy NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, 2013 Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition and Deepwater Canyons 2012 Expedition, NOAA-OER/BOEM.]

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, fishermen express worry about paying for at-sea monitors; ASMFC increases menhaden quota; Maine bans tribal use of fyke nets; Maine delays decision of tribal co-management of commercial fisheries; Maine fishermen receive federal grant to track seafood; new measures prevent striped bass stockpiling; groups team up to collect derelict fishing gear; ASMFC approves Atlantic herring amendment for public comment; researchers develop a model for assess climate change impacts on shellfish; and researchers develop a tool to determine fishery health.

A Good Move for Menhaden

A humpback whale gorges on a school of menhaden. Photo credit: Artie Raslich.

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission decided to take a big picture approach to managing this prey species so that its vital role in the ocean food web is protected. This marks a major shift from the old way of setting catch limits—focusing on a single species—and gives the commission a better way to consider the health of the broader ocean ecosystem.

ASMFC votes on “the most important fish in the sea”

A striped bass caught while munching on menhaden. Photo by Capt. John McMurray.

The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission voted Tuesday, May 5 to develop a system that fully protects the vital role Atlantic menhaden play as a food source for ocean animals. The Commission also approved a modest increase (10%) to the coast wide catch limits on Atlantic menhaden in the two coming fishing years.

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 1

A juvenile black sea bass off the north shore of Massachusetts. Photo: Alex Shure

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, new rules take effect as 2015 fishing year begins; House Natural Resources Committee advances MSA reauthorization bill; NEFMC votes down proposal to close Stellwagen Bank; a new report looks at U.S. fishing trends; black sea bass are now frequent visitors in Maine; ME Marine Resources Panel allows alewife migration up St. Croix River; Casco Bay water chemistry is changing; NH, RI, and ME receive fishery disaster relief funds; State reps sponsor a bill that could bring $100 million to fisheries research; Atlantic Herring Amendment 8 comment period closes; a NYTimes story highlights NEAQ’s microgrant program; and construction begins on the first U.S. offshore wind farm.

Making the Most of the Most Important Fish – It’s time to modernize management of Atlantic menhaden

A striped bass chasing menhaden. Image credit: Pew Charitable Trusts

Fisheries managers for the Atlantic Coast states face an important decision May 5 about what’s sometimes called the most important fish in the sea: Atlantic menhaden. Officials could increase the allowable catch to appease the East Coast’s largest fishing industry. Or they could begin to manage this forage species in a way that protects fish, seabirds, and whales, as well as the interests of the people who care about and depend on those animals from Florida to Maine.

Tracking Fish Oil Supplements to the Source

Menhaden are used to make products such as fertilizer, cosmetics, and fish meal. Photo credit: Paul Dabill

Are fish oil supplements really improving our health but hurting our oceans? That’s one question New York Times bestselling author Paul Greenberg is exploring for his next book, due out next year, The Omega Principle: The Health of Our Hearts, the Strength of Our Minds, and the Survival of our Oceans All in One Little Pill.

Menhaden Meals

A "talon-ted" osprey snags two menhaden at a time. Photo credit: Kristofer Rowe.

Atlantic menhaden are sometimes called “the most important fish in the sea” because so many animals depend on them for food. Here are just a few of those birds, fish, and marine mammals enjoying their favorite meal.

More than 150 Thousand People Urge Protection for Ocean Habitat

Scientists say protecting habitat is one of the best ways to help cod and other depleted fish recover. Photo: Brian Skerry/New England Ocean Odyssey

During the OHA public comment period an extraordinary number of individuals and organizations responded—159,502. That’s an overwhelming vote of public support for habitat protection.