Tagged coastal communities

Final NOAA Rule Weakens Fisheries Protection

Protecting U.S. fisheries from overfishing, and restoring populations of fish that are at unsustainably low levels, just got a little tougher. On Oct. 13, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) announced a final version of guidelines to implement National Standard 1, which directs fisheries managers to prevent overfishing while attaining the greatest economic, ecological, and social benefits for the nation. National Standard 1 is the most important of the 10 standards that guide fisheries managers’ implementation of the nation’s primary fishing law, the Magnuson-Stevens Act. The final rule contains several critical deficiencies. … More Info »

An Ocean Warming: Sea Level Rise

This post originally appeared on New England Ocean Odyssey, as part of “An Ocean Warming,” a series that dives into how climate change will impact New England’s ocean. From summer tourist destinations to local fishing ports and working waterfronts, New England’s coastal communities are a vital part of the region’s culture and economy. Sea level rise will create new problems for those working on fishing docks, beaches, and elsewhere along the water. … More Info »

Fisheries and Fishermen: Part of the Ocean Plan Puzzle

On this World Oceans Day, let’s take a step back from the day-to-day workings of fisheries management to view New England’s ocean on a larger scale. Our region’s fish species, and the fishermen that rely on them, are part of a very busy, ever-changing environment, and although fishery managers only have authority over fishery resources, this idea is an important one to remember. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Tuesday, September 8

In this edition of Fish Talk in the News, fisheries management needs to keep pace with climate change; NEFSC seeks applicants to prepare benchmark stock assessments; NOAA grants $10 million under Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Program; efforts to save a beached great white are unsuccessful; and a town in Maine works to restore historic fish passage. … More Info »