Posted April 2015

Making the Most of the Most Important Fish – It’s time to modernize management of Atlantic menhaden

Fisheries managers for the Atlantic Coast states face an important decision May 5 about what’s sometimes called the most important fish in the sea: Atlantic menhaden. Officials could increase the allowable catch to appease the East Coast’s largest fishing industry. Or they could begin to manage this forage species in a way that protects fish, seabirds, and whales, as well as the interests of the people who care about and depend on those animals from Florida to Maine. … More Info »

Puffin Project Coming to the New England Aquarium

Director of National Audubon Society’s Project Puffin Steve Kress and award-winning journalist/photographer Derrick Jackson will join the New England Aquarium Lecture Series Tuesday, May 5 to discuss their new book, Project Puffin: The Improbable Quest to Bring a Beloved Seabird Back to Egg Rock. … More Info »

Tracking Fish Oil Supplements to the Source

Are fish oil supplements really improving our health but hurting our oceans? That’s one question New York Times bestselling author Paul Greenberg is exploring for his next book, due out next year, The Omega Principle: The Health of Our Hearts, the Strength of Our Minds, and the Survival of our Oceans All in One Little Pill. … More Info »

Menhaden Meals

Atlantic menhaden are sometimes called “the most important fish in the sea” because so many animals depend on them for food. Here are just a few of those birds, fish, and marine mammals enjoying their favorite meal. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, April 24

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NEFMC takes action on habitat amendment; the scallop industry responds to the Regional Administrator’s letter; NEFSC partners to improve fishery surveys; U.S. relies on coldwater shrimp imports; NMFS approves new Atlantic sea scallop fishing rules; Maine’s baby eel season starts slowly; NOAA releases implementation plan for recreational fisheries policy; former CFN journalist receives award for excellence; Mass Lobstermen join national seafood group; and NOAA urges boats to slow down for right whales. … More Info »

Protect New England’s Fish Habitat: The Talking Fish Top 10

Unfortunately, the habitat proposal appears likely to sharply reduce the overall area set aside for habitat protection. As regular readers know, Talking Fish has covered this issue in depth. Here’s the Talking Fish “Top Ten” list of reasons to protect our ocean habitat … More Info »

More than 150 Thousand People Urge Protection for Ocean Habitat

During the OHA public comment period an extraordinary number of individuals and organizations responded—159,502. That’s an overwhelming vote of public support for habitat protection. … More Info »

Incorporating Community into Regional Ocean Planning

It is well documented that the waters off of New England are changing. Between shifts in the ecosystem and changing use patterns, the future of coastal communities is uncertain. What is certain is that the future of our coastal communities is intertwined with decisions about how we use and manage these waters. A well-executed ocean plan will help these communities protect their future, improve ocean management, and result in healthier ecosystems. The Regional Planning Body will take significant steps towards addressing the underlying concerns raised by fishermen and fishing communities around New England. … More Info »

NOAA Warns New England Fishery Council Not to Weaken Ocean Habitat Protection

You might think that habitat protection would be an obvious priority in New England, which has the country’s worst record on overfishing and depleted fish stocks. Unfortunately, this long-overdue plan to manage the region’s ocean habitat could end up slashing protected areas by roughly 70 percent. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, April 17

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, Bullard expresses concern to NEFMC about habitat protection; NOAA reports on 2014 status of stocks; New England fish stocks lag behind; regulators may increase catch quota for bluefin tuna; NEFMC plans to vote on habitat at next week’s council meeting; Herring Amendment 8 final scoping hearing is Monday; Maine’s scallop season seems to finish strong; New England states reduce striped bass bag limit; CT shellfish companies fight with state government; Center for Sustainable Fisheries proposed new trawl survey program; Maine Sea Grant receives $800K; and USDA will propose standards for U.S. raised organic seafood. … More Info »