Posted May 2014

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 30

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NOAA announces a plan to distribute federal fisheries disaster aid, including direct payments to fishermen; a Magnuson-Stevens reauthorization bill passes the House Natural Resources Committee; NOAA closes a herring management area due to high catch levels; papers recognize World Fish Migration Day; Maine can take steps to build resilient coastal economies; Maine’s fisheries are threatened by ocean acidification; labeling and marketing local seafood could help both consumers and fishermen. … More Info »

Sustaining Our Fisheries: Looking at the Big Picture

The U.S. has the gold standard for fishery protection, thanks to the law that governs it—the Magnuson-Stevens Act of 1976 (MSA). Since 2000, the law has helped rebuild 34 fish species and strengthened coastal economies around the country. But we have 40 other stocks that need serious help. So how can we restore our fisheries? Save the Sound held a forum to find out. … More Info »

NOAA Marches to the Beat of Multiple Drummers on Habitat Protection

Sometimes it is hard to understand why agencies do the things they do. Are they just marching to an inaudible tune that somehow makes sense of the sum of their actions? Take the issue of habitat protection. On the one hand, NOAA has been monumentally important around the country by supporting the community-based restoration of coastal estuaries. But then the same agency turns around wearing its fisheries management hat and seems to be operating under a completely different set of principles. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 23

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the FAO releases its State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture Report; river herring run across New England; NEFSC releases a new Ecosystem Advisory showing high sea surface temperatures; the NEFMC releases the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Omnibus Habitat Amendment; a new NOAA report shows the importance of shallow-water bottom habitat; volunteers count horseshoe crabs; Maine indefinitely closes part of the lower Penobscot to lobster fishing due to mercury contamination; a Maine lobsterman is charged for possessing undersized lobsters; Duxbury’s oyster farms thrive; Jon Grabowski develops a framework to evaluate fishing gear impacts on habitat types; sand lance return to Stellwagen and bring humpback whales with them. … More Info »

For World Fish Migration Day, Here Are Some Fish on the Go

Saturday is World Fish Migration Day, with events around the region to raise awareness about open rivers and migratory fish. To help you celebrate, here are a few videos and images of migrating fish and the people who move them. … More Info »

New England Inches Toward Improved Fisheries Management, But There’s a Catch

This week the New England Fishery Management Council holds the first meeting of a committee aiming to revive efforts on Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management, or EBFM. This is great news, but also greatly overdue. … More Info »

Reducing and Minimizing Bycatch

According to some estimates, as much as 40 percent of fish caught around the globe is discarded at sea, dead or dying. We can’t afford to continue this wasteful practice. Stopping the unnecessary squandering of nontarget fish in many U.S. fisheries and reducing the needless incidental killing of untold seabirds, whales, and other marine life by indiscriminate fishing gear is central to a new, national approach to ecosystem-based fisheries management. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 16

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the coasts disagree on Magnuson-Stevens reauthorization; an opinion piece argues managers must adapt to climate effects on fisheries; the ASMFC discusses striped bass catch cuts; the menhaden catch cap has succeeded in reducing the harvest; recreational fishermen say new limits on Gulf of Maine cod and haddock will hurt their business; Connecticut works towards creating a state elver fishery; 2014 may be an El Niño year; the Lenfest Ocean Program creates a Fishery Ecosystem Task Force. … More Info »

Atlantic Menhaden Catch Cap a Success; Millions More of the Most Important Fish in the Sea

The menhaden fishery is the largest on the Atlantic coast and some in the fishing industry warned that the catch limit would harm business, triggering potential cutbacks and layoffs. Despite this pressure the commission followed the science and voted into place a cap that reduced the overall catch of Atlantic menhaden by 25 percent from the previous year. The numbers now are in for the first year of fishing under the new catch cap and it is clear that the commission’s action is achieving its ambitious conservation objectives. … More Info »

No Refuge For Fish? Stressed Species Need Safe Habitat

Overfishing and warming waters are combining to create a potent one-two punch that threatens significant harm to New England’s already beleaguered fish and fishermen. Fortunately, there is one thing we can do to help cushion both blows: protect ocean habitat — the places where fish spawn, grow, and find shelter and food. … More Info »