Posted March 2014

Congress shouldn’t undermine conservation measures that can help rebuild New England fisheries

By Dr. Loren McClenachan. Congress is now beginning to consider the re-authorization of the law that governs our nation’s commercial and recreational fishing grounds from three to 200 miles offshore, the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. There is an opportunity in this process to strengthen the act, so it can prevent overfishing and continue to help rebuild Maine’s depleted fisheries. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, March 28

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, scientist Daniel Pauly argues for stronger fisheries conservation in developing countries; despite high landings, supply still limits the lobster market; hundreds of Maine lobster fishermen sign up for health insurance; Cape Cod will host the 2015 International Oyster Symposium; Maine has set individual elver quotas for non-tribal fishermen; a new UNH study shows that leatherback turtles spend more time than expected in coastal Cape Cod waters; two Massachusetts legislators oppose a reference closed area on Stellwagen Bank; the Mid-Atlantic Council will host a webinar on spiny dogfish trip limits; the river herring Technical Expert Working Group holds its first meeting. … More Info »

Why can’t the US be more like the Canadians?

You don’t usually hear much Canada envy from New England’s fishing industry. But last week, commercial fishermen Vito Giacalone, Richie Canastra, and Jimmy Odlin wrote to the Boston Globe to praise Canada’s haddock regulations, which they say have allowed Canadian fishermen to catch a far larger portion of their haddock quota—93 percent between 2004 and 2011, compared to United States fishermen’s 11 percent over the same period. … More Info »

Business as usual meets the new normal in New England fisheries

This overdue multi-agency session was hosted by the Mid-Atlantic Council in Washington, DC, and was intended to consider the implications of climate change for fisheries management along the US Atlantic coast. It was overdue in that climate change impacts are already being observed by fishermen and scientists alike, and adjusting to our new reality will not be easy and will take time. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, March 21

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Seafood Expo North America hits Boston; Oceana releases a new report on bycatch in US fisheries; NOAA releases proposed regulations for the 2014 fishing year; GARFO is working with stakeholders to implement electronic monitoring; Maine’s elver season will be delayed to implement new regulations; the Mid-Atlantic Council hoses a workshop on climate change and fisheries management. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, March 14

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, horseshoe crab blood is harvested for biomedical testing; recreational fishermen want new language in Magnuson-Stevens; Massachusetts cuts commercial striper limits; Maine’s Lobster Marketing Collaborative joins forces with the Culinary Institute of America; a Boston Globe piece highlights local seafood innovators; Maine closes the southern half of its smelt fishery; a new report assesses the status of commercial vessels docking in Gloucester; three commercial fishermen write to the Boston Globe arguing regulations are preventing fishermen from catching their haddock quota. … More Info »

Habitat Protection: Council Apparently Unclear on the Concept

All discipline and adherence to scientific goals and guidance was lost when the Council decided the fate of fish habitat in the central Gulf of Maine by allowing new bottom trawling in nearly three-quarters of the existing Cashes Ledge groundfish protected area – an area which had been protected for the last 15 years. The Council’s choice for this sub-region ignored the goals and objectives of the OHA, which include protecting habitat that supports critical fish life stages, protecting fish spawning areas and enhancing groundfish productivity. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, March 7

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Senate confirms Kathryn Sullivan as NOAA administrator; the value of Maine’s lobster fishery continues to rise, despite potential threats; brightly colored lobster gear could help prevent entanglements; Maine should address its declining smelt population; Maine’s elver season could be delayed due to disputes over regulations; five countries agree to a moratorium on Arctic fishing; an ocean acidification bill gathers support in Maine; die-offs of urban shellfish may be linked to pollution; shrimp-flavored gelatin could be used as crab bait; local fishermen clean up “ghost gear”; climate change is altering Rhode Island’s marine landscape; BOEM releases an EIS on seismic air gun surveys. … More Info »