Posted October 2013

Same Old, Same Old

It is always interesting but rarely informing to read the often whining editorial opinions that emanate from the nation’s highest landed-value port, New Bedford. The recent column, “Don’t take NOAA for an answer” (New Bedford Standard Times, October 28, 2013), is no exception. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, October 25

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, a WSJ article focuses on tension between fishermen and at-sea observers; NOAA will stop printing nautical charts; the Maine Lobstermen’s Union grows, but so does the divide within the lobster industry; the founder of a Maine lobster processing company wins an entrepreneurship award; the Center for Sustainable Fisheries holds its first board meeting; the shutdown continues to affect fisheries management; NMFS lifts monkfish possession limits for groundfish and scallop vessels; the World Wildlife Fund calls for no increase in Atlantic bluefin quota. … More Info »

One Good Step for River Herring, Then a Stumble

There is ample science supporting measures that would prevent depleted river herring from being scooped up by the industrial trawlers targeting other fish such as Atlantic herring and mackerel. That’s why recent votes by federal and regional fisheries managers have been so frustrating. In the past month we’ve seen one good step forward followed by some serious stumbles. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, October 18

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Center for Biological Diversity files suit against the EPA on ocean acidification; a Gloucester Daily Times editorial calls the Omnibus Habitat Amendment process worthless; lobsters may be the new symbol of climate change; the reopening of surf clam beds is a good example of cooperation between fishermen and regulators; Gloucester and New Bedford receive grants to revitalize their ports; the shutdown caused delays in seafood plant inspections; ASMFC surveys show Maine shrimp are in terrible shape. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, October 11

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, a mussel farm is proposed adjacent to Cape Wind; surf clam beds on Georges Bank are beginning to reopen after 23 years; the New England Aquarium teams up with seafood companies to promote sustainability; a research summit focuses on industry-supported stock assessments; the Wellfleet Oyster Festival draws attention to issues faced by oyster farmers; the shutdown leaves state agencies worried they won’t be able to address marine mammal strandings; a Nature comment calls for a global ocean observatory; a new study identifies genetically distinct river herring stocks. … More Info »

A Squandered Opportunity for Habitat Protection

The New England Fisheries Management Council is struggling to effectively manage significantly depleted stocks like cod, yellowtail flounder and Gulf of Maine haddock while simultaneously coping with unprecedented changes to the ocean environment caused by climate change. These challenges cry out for long term strategies designed to protect and stabilize ocean habitat and buffer against climate impacts. Why, then, is the NEFMC on the verge of squandering an opportunity to employ such critical strategies in its long-awaited fish habitat protection plan? … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, October 4

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NEFSC Science Director William Karp calls for cooperation between fishermen and scientists; an op-ed says MSA reauthorization is a great chance to incorporate ecosystem-based fisheries management; Angela Sanfilippo receives a fishing industry award; scientists use fish to collect meteorological information; op-eds promote dogfish as an excellent local seafood product; NOAA alters the Harbor Porpoise Take Reduction Plan; SMAST uses gliders to collect ocean data and forms the Massachusetts Marine Fisheries Institute Advisory Council. … More Info »

Government Shutdown Shutters Some NOAA Offices

The federal government shutdown is starting to show some limited effects on fisheries management and science. Law enforcement agents, at-sea observers, and seafood inspectors have—so far—not been subject to the furloughs associated with the federal budget impasse. Seafood News.com reports … More Info »