Posted September 2013

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, September 27

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Council makes decisions on Georges Bank yellowtail and river herring bycatch; an feature on ocean acidification highlights its potential to cause serious harm to marine life; several articles focus on changes in fish distribution due to rising sea temperatures; UMass Dartmouth creates a new fisheries research fund; the Massachusetts Port Authority focuses on revitalizing the Fish Pier; Capt. John McMurray supports rebuilding deadlines for overfished stocks. … More Info »

Another One Bites the Dust?

Georges Bank yellowtail was once one of the major species sustaining the New Bedford fleet. Caution should have led managers to consider closing this fishery and closing the areas supporting the remnant yellowtail breeding populations. That apparently was not even on the table. … More Info »

National Estuaries Week: A Call to Action

Natural Estuaries Week is a celebration of our coastal resources, but it must also be a call to action. Without broader public support for policies to restore estuaries and without more pressure on our Congressional leaders to fund these programs, our estuaries and the businesses, communities, and wildlife they support are at risk. … More Info »

Don’t Let River Herring (and Tax Dollars) Get Lost At Sea

Fisheries managers in New England and the mid-Atlantic have a chance to protect river herring and safeguard the public investment of millions of restoration dollars. The fishery management councils for these two regions are set to vote on measures to control the number of these important but imperiled fish that are killed needlessly at sea. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, September 20

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the State of New Hampshire joins Martha Coakley’s lawsuit to raise catch limits; the Coast Guard suspends its search for a reported missing vessel; a newly released report makes recommendations to improve vessel safety; lawmakers and fishermen push back against the MSC certification process; a Vibrio outbreak forces more oyster closures; Brian Rothschild patents a new electronic monitoring method and publishes a paper calling for multi-species assessment methods; charter boat operators argue against a Dedicated Habitat Research Area on Stellwagen Bank; Governor Patrick asks the US Small Business Administration to provide subsidized loans to fishermen; Gulf of Maine shrimp trawl surveys are the lowest on record. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, September 13

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, fishing stakeholders respond to a report and hearing on Magnuson-Stevens reauthorization and rebuilding requirements; a seasonal lobster closure begins in Long Island Sound; Serious Eats highlights Maine lobstering; New Bedford’s Working Waterfront Festival will take place September 28-29; GMRI’s Out of the Blue campaign continues with a focus on whiting; new research shows changes in marine life distribution follow the direction and speed of climate change. … More Info »

The Bottom Line: Rebuilding Plans Work for U.S. Fisheries

Status of US Fish Stocks 1997-2012

By Lee Crockett, The Pew Charitable Trusts. A congressional hearing this week on the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act examined a new report from the National Academies on the law’s effectiveness in rebuilding depleted fish populations. As a member of the peer-review panel for the report, I can attest to the amount of work that went into this study, which clearly recognizes our nation’s overall success in restoring fish stocks. … More Info »

Wicked Tune-Up for Tuna Rules

Atlantic bluefin tuna

Fishermen who catch tuna with harpoons, hand gear, purse seine nets, and longlines gathered last Wednesday in Gloucester, MA, for a hearing on proposed changes to the way we manage the catch of the Atlantic bluefin tuna. Bluefin are highly prized for the sushi market and for recreational fishing. Strong, sleek, and muscular, these fish are astonishingly fast giants that can reach well over a thousand pounds. But their popularity has led to plummeting populations and has landed the bluefin on the red list of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, September 6

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, an NAS report evaluates the success of the Magnuson-Stevens Act; EDF’s Sarah Smith argues that closed areas can help fisheries build resilience to climate change; species distribution in New England is changing, with bonito, black sea bass, and squid moving north; Maine’s record seafood revenues in 2012 were mostly from lobster; UMass scientists prepare to tag juvenile bluefin tuna; USFWS will no longer stock the Merrimack with salmon; the NEFMC releases the agenda for its next meeting; Massachusetts closes 40 oyster beds; PCB resistant killifish in New Bedford Harbor stump scientists. … More Info »

We can restore river herring, but the Mid Atlantic Council and NOAA Fisheries need to step up

We should acknowledge and stress that we can rebuild this culturally and economically important fish that has historically been a critical part of the marine food chain. And that we can, at least to some extent, control mortality both inshore and offshore. A stocks-in-the-fishery designation would give us the tools to do that. It won’t be easy for NOAA Fisheries, or Council staff, to make it happen, but it’s their/our obligation. … More Info »