Posted August 2013

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 30

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, Boston chefs host sustainable seafood dinners; a dolphin die-off is linked to a virus; the Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen’s Alliance provides seafood to a food bank and diversifies to surf clams; scientists locate a right whale breeding ground in the Gulf of Maine; Nantucket recreational fishermen clash with seals; distributors are enjoying the lobster boom; scientists study deep-sea corals; NEFMC members discuss the shifting state of New England’s fish species; Maine surveys green crabs; a Buzzfeed article focuses on elver buyer Bill Sheldon; Arctic terns are rapidly declining in Maine. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 23

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the Science and Statistical Committee discusses yellowtail and haddock; an opinion piece says Saltonstall-Kennedy funds should go to research, not NOAA; magazines argue over the high consumer price of lobster; Massachusetts’ summer flounder season ends; marine protected areas can protect fish populations without hurting fishermen; California serves as an example of successful coexistence with growing seal populations; scientists tag 20 loggerhead sea turtles. … More Info »

Mean, Green Eating Machines: The European green crab is “one of the world’s worst invasives”

Warming ocean temperatures have allowed green crabs to persist farther and farther north along the North American coastlines. Where cold winter chills used to keep its numbers in check, populations of green crabs are now booming places like the Gulf of Maine, and they are eating their way through our precious local seafood. … More Info »

Troubled Waters for Herring

Everything eats herring—from whales to striped bass to seabirds. Without abundant herring stocks, the Atlantic food web doesn’t work. That’s why herring protection brings together a diverse coalition of interests that includes recreational and commercial fishermen, conservation groups and whale-watching businesses. Sadly, two recent decisions by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will have serious impacts on herring, and all of the species that depend upon them. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 16

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NOAA and the Council continue to argue over herring trawl observer coverage; lobster shell disease moves north; the Maine Lobstermen Union holds its first meeting; a new NOAA research vessel will map the seafloor; shark fin bans may hurt the dogfish fishery; low sand lance abundance hurts whale watch businesses; southern species are becoming more common in New England; an expedition to tag great white sharks is moving slowly; lobstermen oppose gear changes; the MAFMC discusses coral conservation; MA fishermen catch fewer, larger bluefin; climate change may inhibit Atlantic salmon recovery; recovering alewife populations feed the lobster bait industry. … More Info »

Deep Sea Canyons on Your Desktop

The live streaming video from the NOAA research vessel Okeanos Explorer brings eye-popping images from the ocean floor as scientists maneuver a remotely operated vehicle (or ROV) called Deep Discoverer along the canyons and seamounts at the edge of the continental shelf. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, August 9

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, a new study shows marine species moving poleward in response to climate change; the ASMFC delays a decision on elver management; NEFMC chair Rip Cunningham writes to John Bullard in response to NERO’s refusal of Amendment 5 to the herring plan; NOAA declines to list river herring under the Endangered Species Act; Obama nominates Kathryn Sullivan to lead NOAA; Maine’s lobster monoculture is vulnerable to climate change; Senator Warren calls for federal disaster aid for the groundfish industry. … More Info »

Managing Fisheries in “A Climate of Change”

The Maine nonprofit Island Institute organized the two-day symposium “A Climate of Change” to bring fishermen, scientists, fishery managers, and NGOs together to share information and ideas about how climate change is already affecting fishing, and what they can do about it. … More Info »

Uncertain Science Isn’t to Blame for Groundfish Crisis

The real issue is not whether there is uncertainty in fisheries management science. Of course there is, and the more you get into the weeds of fishery management science the more the numerous uncertainties reveal themselves. The real issue is how managers choose to deal with the uncertainty that is inherent in fisheries management. In New England, by and large, they deal with it badly. … More Info »

Man, Eating Shark

My plan was to kick off Shark Week by feasting on Squalus acanthias, aka Spiny Dogfish, and reporting my impressions. Spiny dogfish are one of the few fish populations in good biological condition that New England fishermen can still catch, having recovered from a crash back in the early 1990’s. Once a fish despised because of the havoc it caused with fishing gear and its voracious predation on more valuable commercial fish, many fishermen who can no longer find cod or other prime species are turning to dogfish out of financial desperation. … More Info »