Posted April 2013

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, April 26

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, NOAA repeats its refusal of interim measures after a request from Governor Patrick; NEFMC meets and discusses climate change; a bill to allow Maine fishermen to sell lobster bycatch fails; NMFS authorizes smaller mesh size for redfish; a bill to reintroduce alewives to the St. Croix River comes into effect; federal budget cuts mean NOAA furloughs. … More Info »

Squelching the People’s Voice

Fenway Park seats approximately 37,000 people.

So despite a confusing public process and a paltry 15-day comment period, enough people to fill Fenway Park twice over took time out to participate in the public process. And by a ratio of 12 thousand to one they told NOAA to keep the closed areas closed. But you wouldn’t know this from visiting the official public record for the proposal on the internet. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, April 19

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, the proposed rule to open closed areas faces strong opposition; NOAA suspends monkfish possession limits; oyster populations are threatened by climate change; lobster fishermen fear a glut caused by warmer waters; Newfoundland cod populations may never recover; a Maine bill to allow groundfishermen to sell lobster bycatch is controversial; the implementation plan for the National Ocean Policy is released. … More Info »

The Fish are Talking, but Can We Listen?

The scientists who study cod populations have tried a lot of different ways to figure out where cod aggregate and to observe their behavior, like trawl surveys, sonar, and even underwater video cameras. But recently, a team of federal and state fisheries scientists have developed a new way to observe groups of cod. Rather than watching them, they’re listening to them—and they’re hearing some pretty interesting stories that could help us protect this depleted species. … More Info »

Wrong Move for Right Whales

A pending decision on fishing for cod and other groundfish in New England has big implications for marine mammals including some of the most endangered animals in our waters, the North Atlantic right whale. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, April 12

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, communities react to the start of spring herring runs; Maine’s legislature approves a bill to open fishways on the St. Croix to alewives; other Maine bills would help out large vessels and allow groundfishermen to sell lobster bycatch; the elver fishery continues to draw crime and controversy; New Bedford processors diversify; healthy menhaden stocks support smallmouth bass; the disastrous Gulf of Maine shrimp season ends; debate on closed areas continues. … More Info »

Top Ten Reasons to Protect New England’s Closed Areas

Why should NOAA reject the plan to expand commercial fishing in 5,000 square miles of protected waters? Let us count the ways. … More Info »

70,000 Citizens, 100 Scientists Want New England’s Waters Protected

More than a hundred prominent scientists are urging federal officials to prevent the return of damaging, bottom trawl fishing to waters that have protected fish habitat and spawning areas in New England for nearly two decades. The scientists aren’t the only ones speaking up. More than 70 thousand people sent comments opposing the proposal. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, April 5

In this week’s Fish Talk in the News, two Senators push for fisheries disaster aid; NEFMC will discuss raising the catch limit for white hake; a bill to open the St. Croix to alewives gains traction; Gov. LePage threatens reprisals against Passamaquoddy Tribe over elver fishery; acoustic monitoring may help locate spawning cod aggregations; Senator Jack Reed pushes for Rhode Island membership on Mid-Atlantic Council. … More Info »

Help Count River Herring (Because They Count, Too)

Somewhere out there on our coast, out where rivers hit salt water, thousands of small fish are gathering, getting ready for an epic voyage inland. The annual run of river herring is about to start. Hundreds of people are getting ready, too. They’re the volunteers who will gather at bridges, fish ladders and riverbanks to count the passing herring—an important exercise in citizen science that can help to conserve these imperiled fish. … More Info »