Posted May 2012

Investing in fisheries science for management success

To me, fisheries management often feels like looking across the Grand Canyon at the beckoning but unreachable other side. Everyone has a shared goal for management but no idea how to really make it happen or who should make it happen. In order to meet the demands of successful fisheries management, we need federal dollars invested in fisheries science. … More Info »

Taking Stock of New England Fish: Part 2

TalkingFish.org interviews Mike Palmer, Research Fisheries Biologist in the Population Dynamics Branch of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center. In this post, Mike Palmer explains the basic steps to conduct a stock assessment and the role of models in stock assessments. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 25

Interesting stories this week: Boston brings local and fresh fish to its farmers markets; disconcerting news about Thailand’s seafood export industry; and recipes for healthy fish stocks. … More Info »

A Small ‘Catch’ in Recent Fisheries Coverage

(By Lee Crockett of the Pew Environment Group) I want to follow up to make an important distinction between catch limits and catch shares, a difference that has been inadequately explained by NOAA and has resulted in some understandable confusion. The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act requires properly set and enforced catch limits that prevent overfishing and ensure the rebuilding of depleted fish populations. … More Info »

Taking Stock of New England Fish: Part 1

TalkingFish.org interviews Mike Palmer, Research Fisheries Biologist in the Population Dynamics Branch of the Northeast Fisheries Science Center. In this post, the first in the series, Mike Palmer talks about his background and interest in fisheries science and the types of data used in stock assessments. … More Info »

Congress, Catch Shares, and the Councils

Last week, the U.S. House of Representatives held a spirited debate and ultimately voted for an appropriations rider that prohibits NOAA, NMFS and the councils from developing new catch shares management plans on the East Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico. While this debate was focused on catch shares as a means of management, which has been a lightning rod of controversy lately, the message it sends to the councils is far more concerning. If Representatives Frank (D-MA), Southerland (R-FL) and others are upset about how catch shares are being implemented in particular fisheries, the appropriate response should be to focus on addressing the issues in those specific fisheries and regions. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 18

This week’s interesting fishing and seafood-related stories: the ethics of seafood; NOAA’s annual status of the stocks report; making sure funding for ocean programs stays in the federal budget; CLF’s Peter Shelley talking about seafood on WGBH; and what local seafood to keep and eye out for at the market this summer. … More Info »

Slinging Mud

The mud in Casco Bay, Maine, is changing. According to an article last fall in the Bangor Daily News, areas that used to contain vast quantities of economically valuable clams are now “dead mud.” Local clammers are finding that sites of former abundance are now completely devoid of shellfish. Even efforts to seed the formerly thriving areas with shellfish larvae are not yielding results. Some scientists think that the increasing acidity of the mud, due partly to the increased carbon dioxide being absorbed from the atmosphere, is making conditions unsuitable for shellfish larvae to form, well, shells. … More Info »

Fish Talk in the News – Friday, May 11

This week’s interesting fish stories: how much fish is safe to eat without danger from contaminants; a new seafood purchasing opportunity in NH lets consumers buy fish directly off the boat; interviews with one of New England’s last remaining weir fishermen; and a video from a fishing village in Thailand. … More Info »

Why fishermen should care about the National Ocean Policy

As I gaze appreciatively out on the harbor this morning, I must remind myself that I sat down to write about some things that are happening in Washington that might forever change the character of life here in Friendship. The connections between the two places, at least in my thoughts today, are the budgetary battles in Washington over whether to restrict funding for the implementation of the National Ocean Policy and the important regional ocean planning efforts that should soon follow. … More Info »